border crossing | Texas Public Radio

border crossing

The Washington Square building in San Antonio, where immigration court is held.
Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

Big white tent complexes in two Texas border towns are drawing attention. These are temporary courtrooms, the latest effort by the Trump administration to more quickly work through thousands of migrant asylum cases.


This week, we’ve continued to see the disturbing images coming from the detention centers on the southern border. The families keep making the journey from their home countries to the US/Mexico border, risking family separation—and more. 

Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

The U.S. and Mexico reached an agreement on Friday that was expected to defuse the Trump administration's threat of tariffs on Mexican products. Mexico said it will do more to stop the flow of migrants coming north, which includes immediately expanding the Migrant Protection Protocols across its entire southern border.


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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The White House says it's seen a "record-shattering surge" of migrant families at the Southwest border in the past year — and wasted no time trying to blame those rising numbers on what it calls "loopholes" in U.S immigration law.

More than 161,000 migrant family members were apprehended or found inadmissible at the Southwest border in FY 2018, which ended last month. That's according to figures released today by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

From Texas Standard:

You've almost certainly heard about the dog days of summer, but do you know about canicula? You probably do if you're from the Rio Grande Valley. Otherwise, perhaps not.

Carson Frame / TPR News

It’s been just over a week since the governors of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California committed to sending around 2,000 National Guard members to the U.S.-Mexico border.

That’s in response to a call to action by President Trump, who says there’s been an uptick in illegal border crossings and drug trafficking.

Some 900 troops have already arrived, but operations are not yet fully underway.


Arrests of people trying to cross illegally into the U.S. from Mexico plunged to the lowest level since 1971, as fewer people attempted the trek, the Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday.

Meanwhile, immigration arrests in the interior of the country increased by 25 percent, the data show.

The newly released data provides the most comprehensive look yet at how immigration enforcement is changing under the Trump administration.

Immigrant rights activists called the deaths of immigrants found in a trailer over the weekend "a senseless tragedy" at Sunday night's candlelight vigil honoring the victims.

From Texas Standard:

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said just yesterday that it is "unlikely" that a wall along the United States' southern border will be built in full. That’s different from the Trump administration's original proposed plans to build a continuous 30-foot wall, regardless of the terrain and other potential obstacles.

 

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