Border | Texas Public Radio

Border

The streets of downtown Laredo, Texas, are deserted. For decades, this dense retail district has catered to Mexican shoppers coming across the bridge from Nuevo Laredo. But these days, stores like Cindy's Electronics, Classic Perfumes, and Casa Raul Mens' Clothes are shuttered.

"Now our business has dropped 80 to 90%," says Natividad Dominguez, leaning on a glass case full of empanadas, turnovers and donuts at Pano's Bakery. "People would come across the bridge and pick up a donut. But no more. It's affecting us a lot."

Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. De’Jon Williams

Thousands of military troops remain deployed at the U.S.-Mexico border as part of the Trump administration’s effort to prevent illegal crossings. Some of them are active duty service members, but many are part of the National Guard — from states as far away as Iowa and Kentucky. 

It's an unusual deployment, with troops quartered in hotels and families allowed to visit.

A new report by Physicians for Human Rights documents evidence of lasting psychological harm for migrant children and parents subjected to the Trump Administration's family separation policy, which was intended to dissuade migration to the nation's southern border.


Henry Cuellar (TX-28) faces his first serious primary challenge from Jessica Cisneros.
Courtesy

Fifteen-year incumbent Henry Cuellar aims to retain control of Texas' 28th congressional district in a heated race against his first Democratic primary challenger, Jessica Cisneros.


A visit to the now-defunct Fort Brown Memorial Golf Course in Brownsville, Texas, is a cautionary tale of how Trump's border wall can create dead zones. The clubhouse is shuttered, par signs are fading and the once-manicured greens are fields of weeds.

In 2008, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, working with the University of Texas at Brownsville, built a security fence on the southern edge of the campus that effectively walled off the popular golf course from the rest of the city.

Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

While Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren campaigns in early primary states, her surrogates in Texas continued a Latino community engagement tour. Dozens of people have turned out for events in San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley.

The number of people apprehended by U.S. authorities, either attempting to cross the southwest border illegally or presenting themselves at a port of entry, declined for the fifth consecutive month, according to new figures released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Just over 45,000 people were apprehended in October, down from a spike of 144,000 in May — an almost 70 percent decline.

Authorities also report a significant demographic shift among those apprehended.

In the new book Border Wars: Inside Trump’s Assault on Immigration the authors New York Times journalists Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael D. Shear give us an understanding of recent U.S. immigration policy. We learn what is driving these policies and how well they are working.


Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Julián Castro, a Democratic presidential candidate, visited asylum seekers in Matamoros, Mexico, on Monday.


Richard Loria for Texas Public Radio

U.S. officials have sent back to Mexico more than 30,000 asylum-seeking migrants to wait for their immigration court dates. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program. Pregnant women are among some of the people sent back. But one attorney from the Rio Grande Valley pushed back at the policy. She tried to get her client paroled and back into Texas.


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