Border | Texas Public Radio

Border

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Julián Castro, a Democratic presidential candidate, visited asylum seekers in Matamoros, Mexico, on Monday.


Richard Loria for Texas Public Radio

U.S. officials have sent back to Mexico more than 30,000 asylum-seeking migrants to wait for their immigration court dates. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program. Pregnant women are among some of the people sent back. But one attorney from the Rio Grande Valley pushed back at the policy. She tried to get her client paroled and back into Texas.


A young girl at a migrant shelter in Nuevo Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Monday on "The Source" -- Who are the people coming to the U.S. for asylum? What drives them to leave their homes and what are they finding when they arrive at the Southern border?


Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

The city’s migrant resource center continues to help asylum seekers who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border and were transported to San Antonio. At least 27,000 people received a warm meal, a medical screening, a safe place to rest or travel assistance since March.

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported its agents apprehended more than 800,000 migrants since last October along the U.S.-Mexico border, and many took place in the Border Patrol's Del Rio sector.

Verónica G. Cárdenas

The U.S.-Mexico border recently dominated news headlines, from reports on overcrowded detention facilities to the “Stay in Mexico” policy. Two journalists say the region is more complex and culturally rich than what is portrayed in mainstream media

Then, young people living in San Antonio public housing get an education in art and culture in a printmaking summer workforce session.

Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/2JrNBle

Thousands of migrant children and adults are currently subject to dangerous overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and prolonged internment at U.S. detention facilities.


The Government Accountability Office says the military isn't doing enough to deal with the effects of climate change, after more than $9 billion in hurricane and flood-related damage to three bases in less than a year.

Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

Residents in the Rio Grande Valley gathered at vigils in McAllen and Brownsville on Sunday evening to remember the lives of Oscar Alberto Martinez Ramirez and his 23-month-old daughter, Angie Valeria.

The Salvadoran father and daughter drowned as they tried to cross the river between Matamoros and Brownsville last Sunday. Valeria’s mother, Tania Vanessa Avalos, watched as her family was swept away.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

On Thursday night Congress passed a $4.6 billion emergency border aid bill, but it wasn’t the spending bill that many Democrats in the House said they wanted – including Speaker Nancy Pelosi.


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