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courtesy michael-morton.com / ©

The now famous case of Michael Morton looms over Texas law, law enforcement, and legal procedure. 

Convicted of murdering his wife, Morton was sentenced to life in prison in 1987, but would later be completely exonerated fro the crime. It is a cautionary reminder of what happens when overzealous law officials and prosecutors decide the facts of a crime rather than investigate it. 

Populous

  The promise of downtown development in the form of convention centers has sparked the revitalization efforts in several cities. Rarely do people go back to make sure the promises were fulfilled.

In his new book, "Convention Center Follies," University of Texas San Antonio Professor Heywood Sanders highlights several cities where the promise was fueled by fuzzy math and circular logic.

Guest:

Paul Flahive / ©

    

In very few places has the syntax of a sentence caused more excitement, passion, hatred, and hyperbole than the Second Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

Is the militia a limitation on who gets guns? The people an afterthought? Or, is it the other way around and the militia is the less important of the two?

Flickr user Cliff / cc

In a 2007 Pew Poll, Jon Stewart was ranked as one of the most admired journalists in the country. The problem being that "The Daily Show" host is actually a comedian, and his news-skewering show is not, in-fact, news.

Gino Narboni

Now here's somebody who's led an interesting life.  He’s Gino Narboni. And no, he’s not Italian.

“I started in North Africa, in Algeria,” he said.

He’s a softspoken 90-something-year-old man now, but what a life he’s led. He ran off to join General de Gaulle’s free French movement. When they asked him what he wanted to do, he said, "I want to fly. Ha! I was barely 20 at the time.”

The free French didn’t have any airplanes then, but Gino eventually got his wish.

“I was sent to the United States for pilot training,” he said.

Universal Studios

  When Dr. Joel Gold met a patient who thought his every action was being filmed and broadcast to the world a la "The Truman Show" he was intrigued but it wasn't until a steady stream of people with similar delusions that he and his brother decided to write about it.

In his new book, "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Affects Madness," Gold makes the case for how our environments are affecting our thoughts and sometimes causing our delusions.

Lois Lenski illustrated Platt & Munk's 1930 edition of The Little Engine.
Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

The efforts to keep high-tech military technology out of the hands of enemy states and combatants  comes to light in the book "Operation Shakespeare." 

Investigative reporter John Shiffman tells us about Homeland Security's three-year effort to block and apprehend arms traders from accessing some of America's leading technologies. 

Guest:

Jones Collection, DeGolyer Library, Central University Libraries, Southern Methodist University

*This show is a rebroadcast of the April 18, 2014 episode of Texas Matters

Texas Matters: Dive into the hidden history of early Texas photographs with Lawrence T. Jones, III, whose new book, "Lens on the Texas Frontier," presents a stunning look at life in early Texas.

The history of truth in the political and corporate spheres is a sordid one. Our elected officials have gotten us into wars and our corporate leaders have driven the economy into recession --  both on the assumption that their analysis and statements were honest.

In his new book "935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity," Charles Lewis reveals the lies of our public officials and corporate titans while highlighting the journalism and journalists that revealed the lies for what they were.

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