Bioscience-Medicine | Texas Public Radio

Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience and Medical news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Paul Domenick http://bit.ly/2CwC9C6

Texas received an F when it comes to lead levels in drinking water at schools, according to the Texas Public Interest Research Group and Environment Texas Research and Policy Center. That was the same grade it got in 2017. Texas was among 22 states that received the failing grade.

Mahadevan et al., 2019 / University of Texas at San Antonio

A San Antonio researcher hopes to eventually get 100,000 people to enroll in a first-of-its-kind study on cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s, and anyone who doesn’t mind wearing a fitbit can volunteer.

Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Tucked inside a nondescript building in a residential neighborhood in northwest San Antonio is a little cafe. However, here the coffee doesn't come in Italian sizes, and the guests provide the music. Welcome to a memory cafe.

From Texas Standard:

Cannabidiol products – better known as CBD – are fairly new to Texas. They usually come in the form of oils, drinks or snacks containing the nonpsychoactive chemical compound found in cannabis, THC. CBD products usually contain just a minuscule amount of THC, and can't get you high, but when ingested, some say they alleviate inflammation and anxiety. But in Texas, where products containing THC are mostly illegal, where does that leave CBD? The city attorney of Edinburg recently asked just that in a letter to Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.

Molly Smith, a reporter for the McAllen Monitor, says the city attorney wants Paxton to issue a formal legal opinion because he says there's a legal "grey area" in Texas. Smith says most people, including CBD vendors, assume it's legal because their products contain such a minute amount of THC – less than what's legal under the Texas Compassionate Use Act, which allows people with certain severe health conditions to use products with less than 0.5 percent THC. Plus, she says federal law also makes it easy to assume that CBD is legal.

Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Professors at the University of Texas at San Antonio are using 3D tech to show their undergraduates how interesting a medical career can be. But that's the easy part. The hard part is convincing them to spend some of that career in rural Texas.

From Texas Standard:

A global controversy erupted after a Chinese scientist claimed to have used the gene-editing tool CRISPR to manipulate genes in the embryos of twin girls to try to boost their resistance to HIV. The idea of gene editing goes back to at least the 1960s, and it’s the topic of the new documentary “Human Nature,” which will premiere at the South by Southwest festival in Austin this month.

Jr de Barbosa https://bit.ly/2ITXVoY

An expert on opioid use disorder in San Antonio is on a mission to get more Texas doctors qualified to prescribe a medication that has a high rate of success in treating opioid addiction but that too few doctors can legally prescribe.

Edward Thompson https://bit.ly/2TdVl1Z

For many people, weight loss surgery is a health game changer. But a San Antonio researcher says some patients are running into an unexpected and underdiagnosed complication years after the surgery.

 

Nathan Sokul

A pair of Trinity University undergrads who set out to create something to help people take opioid medication with less risk have instead developed a product that has the potential to improve how new medications are tested all over the world.

Gavin Buchanan, 19, and Andrew Aertker, 20,  were in an entrepreneurship program together, and working on a class assignment.

The Alzheimer's Association hopes to determine if lifestyle changes can delay brain changes that lead to cognitive decline.
NIH Image Gallery http://bit.ly/2IEO8D3

The Alzheimer's Association is preparing to launch a study to see if lifestyle changes in older Americans can stave off the development of dementia.

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