Bioscience-Medicine | Texas Public Radio

Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience and Medical news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Kathy West Studios

San Antonio researchers will experiment with older baboons to see if new drugs can help ease the challenges that come with getting older. Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute hope the medicines will reverse cognitive decline and memory problems in older people.


NIH Photo Gallery

The Department of Defense is funding research in San Antonio to see if a new vaccine can prevent birth defects in babies of women exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy. 

 


What sounds like music to us may just be noise to a macaque monkey.

That's because a monkey's brain appears to lack critical circuits that are highly sensitive to a sound's pitch, a team reported Monday in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

The finding suggests that humans may have developed brain areas that are sensitive to pitch and tone in order to process the sounds associated with speech and music.

Kent Stephenson is on a treadmill, working to put one foot in front of the other as a team of trainers helps guide his legs. There’s a harness holding him upright, but Stephenson is, in a sense, walking again — 10 years after a motocross accident left him paralyzed.

Dr. Pat Crocker, a retired Central Texas emergency room doctor, says one of the struggles of his career was "trying to walk that line between empathy and self-harm." He says he wanted to maintain the human connection of medicine while not identifying too closely with patients' pain and tragedy.

From Texas Standard:

Americans pay some of the highest prices in the developed world for prescription medication: On average, each individual spends $1,200 per year. But now, some states are trying to change that. On Wednesday, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed into law a bill that would implement a price cap on insulin, the first law of its kind in the nation.

cabriolet2008 / http://bit.ly/2HHs3jB

Measles and mumps have shown up in Texas, and both are preventable if children get the MMR vaccine. But some doctors are concerned that people may be not be aware of the third illness included in the MMR vaccine acronym. The R stands for rubella, also known as German measles.

Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Teen-aged siblings who were both on a kidney transplant list in San Antonio received organs from the same donor on the same day.

NASA

Scientists from UT Health San Antonio are among the select few who have expanded their research to include the final frontier.

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