Bioscience-Medicine | Texas Public Radio

Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience and Medical news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Large and small cities in Texas are becoming increasingly vulnerable to measles outbreaks as more parents exempt their children from required vaccinations, according to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

In the first two weeks after a person is released from jail, they are 40 times more likely to die of an overdose, according to Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar.

 


A mobile unit with showers, toilets, sinks and one laundry room with a full washer and dryer.
Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

Asylum-seeking migrants often make it to San Antonio without having the opportunity to bathe for weeks beforehand. Similarly, there are residents of San Antonio who don't have access to clean water. 


El Paso community members grieve at a memorial for Javier Amir Rodriguez — the youngest of 22 victims who died from a mass shooting at a Walmart on Aug. 3, 2019.
Carlos Morales | Marfa Public Radio

Austin Eubanks was 17 when he survived the mass shooting at Columbine High School in 1999. He watched his best friend die. In the years following, he struggled with addiction, got clean and became a motivational speaker. He detailed his experiences in a TEDx Talk in 2017 in Denver.

In April, Eubanks died of a heroin overdose.

Eubanks is not the only person who survived a mass shooting, or lost someone in a mass shooting, to later succumb to the lingering impact of trauma and grief.  


Nancy Cook-Monroe | Abode

"This is a little walk I take every morning, just to spend time with God."

Jack Hall is meandering along a path around the backyard of a modest home on the Northeast Side of San Antonio. 


ULiSSES is currently being tested using animal organs, like this pig heart, to see how long it can keep organs healthy for transplant.
Matthew Buikema | VPS

Researchers in San Antonio are working together on a device that will improve soldiers' chances of having an arm or leg successfully reattached if it is lost in combat.


How Texas Fits Into Trump's HIV Eradication Plan

Jul 18, 2019

From Texas Standard:

This week, several federal officials, including the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, met with health workers in Austin to talk about a strategy for combatting HIV. It’s part of the Trump administration’s larger plan to significantly reduce the number of new infections of the virus over the next 10 years. The president wants to start that effort by spending $291 million in the next fiscal year.

Austin is a “hot spot” for clinics marketing stem-cell treatments directly to consumers. In 2017, 100 of the 716 clinics in the U.S. that promoted the regenerative properties of stem cells to treat everything from dental problems to neurological diseases were in Texas. But there is limited research to prove the safety and efficacy of some of those treatments, and new research suggests there are unqualified people administering them.

Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

Nearly 300 people packed into the sanctuary of a Mennonite church on San Antonio’s South Side to participate in a town hall exploring the reasons why the city is such a dangerous place for women.

 


Two Texas doctors are suing the state over a law prohibiting them from selling prescription drugs to their patients.

Pages