Bioscience-Medicine | Texas Public Radio

Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience and Medical news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

From Texas Standard:

Pain is one of those things that is hard to wrap your head around - it's hard to measure, it varies according to your age and health condition. And pain and what we know about pain – particularly chronic pain – also varies by race.

UTSA

Sleep apnea is a common breathing problem plaguing an estimated 22 million Americans. Some of those cases are so severe, patients have to sleep with a bulky device to help them breathe normally during the night. Engineers at the University of Texas at San Antonio are trying to come up with a more user-friendly device.

Joseph Barrios knows firsthand how sleep apnea can affect your life."It’s a terrible feeling," Barrios said. "You’re literally suffocating and you wake up just (breathing hard). I was constantly waking up due to snoring, breathlessness at night. And that’s what led to the CPAP prescription."

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A report released on Dec. 5, 2016, in San Antonio shows Latino children drink more sugary drinks earlier in life than their counterparts, putting them at greater risk of obesity.

High-calorie sodas, sports drinks, juices, and flavored milks are all beverages infants and toddlers don’t need. Yet Rosalie Aguilar of Salud America!, a national obesity prevention network targeting Latinos, says Hispanic parents tend to give their children these drinks at a young age.

Whoever wins this presidential election will have a lot of big decisions to make within their first year in office. One of those decisions is what to do about states, like Texas, that haven’t expanded Medicaid to more low income people under the Affordable Care Act.


Can Working Too Hard Give You A Stroke?

Oct 3, 2016

From Texas Standard:

In 2001, Jonas Koffler was working for a tech startup in Austin. He was 26 years old, ambitious, and climbing the company ladder by working over 70 hours a week. He'd work around the clock, taking cat naps rather than logging a full night's sleep.

He was happy to do it, too. His hard work, it seemed, was getting results. And then – suddenly – everything stopped. One moment he was giving a presentation; the next, he was in a hospital. He'd had a stroke. The doctors told him that the stress and overexertion from his work may have helped cause it.

 


The World Health Organization is revising its advice to people who may have been exposed to the Zika virus and who are interested in getting pregnant.

The WHO now says couples who have visited an area where there’s Zika should wait at least six months before trying to conceive, whether or nor either person had symptoms. Previously, the organization had advised women who may have been exposed to Zika wait 8 weeks, and men who may have been exposed to wait six months.

Laredo Braces For Zika Outbreak

Aug 24, 2016
AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Dr. Hector Gonzalez is standing on the Laredo side of the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge—staring across the Rio Grande at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

“The majority of trailers, the majority of people, pedestrians, the majority of cargo--comes through Laredo,” says Gonzalez, director of Laredo’s Health Department. “But that also, for us, implies disease.”

Beatrice Sanchez and Mariana Arias drive around their city, Winston-Salem, N.C., in search of a very specific population of residents: Latinos with prediabetes.

The two women, both bilingual and Hispanic, are recruiting participants for a Type 2 diabetes prevention study called "La Comunidad," a lower-cost local version of the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program trial that staved off diabetes through changes in diet and physical activity in about 50 percent of study participants.

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