Bernie Sanders | Texas Public Radio

Bernie Sanders

Hillary Clinton got lucky Monday night. Very lucky.

But not for the reasons some are alleging.

Some have attributed her squeaker of a victory over Bernie Sanders in the Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses to an improbable lucky streak of tiebreaking coin tosses.

Iowa has once again proved its perennial resistance to political inevitability and the power of personality.

In this year's iteration of the Iowa caucuses, national polling leaders Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had their campaign momentum slowed in significant ways by party activists who preferred their rivals.

A big win in Iowa might have set either leader on the path to a relatively easy nomination. But that was not to be, and now both Trump and Clinton face difficult and perhaps protracted struggles to overcome rivals they had hoped to dismiss.

Hillary Clinton encountered rougher seas Sunday night in her latest meeting with her rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination. Both Sen. Bernard Sanders and former Gov. Martin O'Malley questioned her veracity and intensified their criticism of her policy positions and campaign financing.

College student Belen Sisa loves Bernie Sanders.

Sisa, a 21-year-old who attends Chandler-Gilbert Community College, is so passionate about the Vermont senator and Democratic presidential hopeful, she was rooting for him to run for president long before he announced his candidacy.

On a recent Friday evening in downtown Phoenix, Sisa and other volunteers set up a Sanders table at the city's monthly art walk. They propped up a life-size cardboard cutout of the candidate, chanted "Feel the Bern!" and registered fellow Sanders supporters to vote in the primary.

There are many ways to describe Bernie Sanders: a democratic socialist, an independent senator, a Democratic presidential candidate. But the best adjective may just be: consistent. No matter how you label it, Sanders' worldview is locked in.

Over 40 years, Sanders has built his political career on a very focused message about what he calls a "rigged economy."

"Front-runner" can be a tenuous word. But when it comes to at least one group, Hillary Clinton is far and away the leader — the Democratic Party establishment.

There's no better measure of that establishment than unpledged party leaders and elected official delegates, better known as "superdelegates."

Among this group, Clinton leads Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders 359 to 8, according to an AP survey of the group that will help elect the nominee at the Democratic National Convention in July. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has two people supporting him from this group.

In this extended version of NPR's interview with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, portions of which aired earlier this week on Morning Edition, the presidential candidate makes his case differently. Having been wrong-footed several times by his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, Sanders is joining the battle more forcefully and talking more personally than in the past.

It was late summer when America began to "feel the Bern," and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the beneficiary of that warm-weather bump, still sees himself as hot on the campaign trail to the White House.

Sanders sat down Wednesday with Steve Inskeep, host of NPR's Morning Edition, to review his own remarkably resilient campaign. Inskeep asked the self-described Democratic socialist from Vermont if he sees a path to the Democratic nomination.

This story comes from Vermont Public Radio and is an abridged version of its feature "Becoming Bernie: His Rise And His Record." You can view the full story here.

Bernie Sanders is an improbable politician. Independent, occasionally irascible, he came from the far left and an urban background to win elections in one of the most rural states in the country.

Virginia Alvino

U.S. Housing Secretary Julian Castro Thursday returned home to San Antonio and appeared with Hillary Clinton at a rally designed to kick off her “Latinos for Hillary” effort.

Castro endorsed Clinton in her bid for the Democratic presidential nomination and ratcheted up the ongoing speculation that Clinton could choose him as her vice presidential running mate if she becomes the party’s nominee.

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