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Mexican authorities ordered the shutdown of all nonessential businesses and industries for the entire month of April in hopes of stemming the spread of the coronavirus. To the shock of many, added to the list of nonessential industries was all alcoholic beverage production. Within days a whole new set of panic buying was taking place. Forget the run on toilet paper, beer hoarding was on in cities and towns throughout Mexico.

From Texas Standard:

The name Shiner is synonymous with the bock beer that's been brewed at the Spoetzl Brewery in the small Texas town of Shiner for more than 100 years.

But now, the name of another bock is appearing around town, plastered onto large billboards promoting Karbach, a beer produced in Houston. The Anheuser-Busch InBev conglomerate – also the parent company of Budweiser -- recently acquired Karbach, and that's not sitting well with some folks in Shiner.

Erin Douglas is a business reporter for the Houston Chronicle. She says the Spoetzl Brewery responded to the new billboards with an open letter to Karbach.

To the uninitiated it can be a bit of a shock, but at the end of a weekend road race or triathlon, right next to the bananas and Gatorade, you are increasingly likely these days to find the beer tent.

Geoffrey Pedder, 41, recently launched the Zelus Beer Company in Medfield, Mass., to capitalize on this growing trend.

Bri Kirkham | Texas Public Radio

It’s been three years since Dorćol Distilling & Brewing Company started brewing their HighWheel brand of beer. And for three years, everytime patrons in their taproom ask to buy a six-pack or fill a growler to take home, they’ve heard the same answer: 

“No.”

That’s because of Texas laws — which will change on Sunday.


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From Texas Standard:

For years, there's been talk about the growth of the craft beer business. Breweries have been popping up all over Texas to fill a thirst for locally made suds. But it's worth wondering whether we've reached a saturation point. In December, Big Bend Brewing announced it was suspending its operations and Noble Rey Brewing in Dallas just filed for bankruptcy protection.

Pabst Brewing and MillerCoors have ended a legal dispute that had put the fate of Pabst Blue Ribbon, Schlitz and other blue-collar beers in doubt, reaching a settlement as a jury considered their case. Under the deal, MillerCoors will continue to brew the beers under contract for Pabst.

Research published this week predicting that beer prices could double as rising global temperatures and more volatile weather cause shortages of barley created a big splash. Twitter users and major news outlets widely circulated the dire headlines. But brewers and barley growers say you shouldn't drown your sorrows just yet: They have a plan.

The price of beer could rise sharply this century, and it has nothing to do with trends in craft brewing. Instead, a new study says beer prices could double, on average, because of the price of malted barley, a key ingredient in the world's favorite alcoholic drink.

By projecting heat and drought trends over the coming decades, a team of researchers in China, the U.K. and the U.S. found that barley production could be sharply affected by the shifting climate. And that means some parts of the world would very likely be forced to pay much more for a beer.

To tell how the nation's first black beer festival came to be held in Pittsburgh, you might start with a beer.

Maybe it was that introductory Sam Adams Boston Lager that longtime Michelob and Heineken guy Mike Potter drank more than a decade ago. "It had a completely different profile, a completely different taste, you know, completely different aroma," he says. "It just elevated my curiosity."

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