Art | Texas Public Radio

Art

Cindy Kelleher Photography

On February 22, 2015, Texas Public Radio partnered with the Briscoe Museum and the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo to raise awareness of the talented artists participating in the Student Western Art Contest, Exhibit and Auction. TPR listeners were invited to a private viewing of the exhibit at the Briscoe Western Art Museum, where they browsed the galleries and learned more about the talented student artists.

Jack Morgan

On Thursday night, about 350 western art lovers gathered at the Briscoe Western Art Museum’s Jack Guenther Pavilion to see the twenty-six winning artworks and meet the high school kids who created them. Student Western Art Committee Chair Gus Salazar runs the show.

“I’ve been blown away by the talent that these kids have. The talent is just incredible. I mean, you would think that these were professional artists up there."

Jack Morgan

The San Antonio Museum of Art thinks the best way to understand contemporary Japanese Ceramics is to wind the clock back about twelve thousand years.  That’s because unlike other cultures, twelve thousand years ago Japanese were actually making pots.

“The earliest known culture in the world that produced ceramics."

Emily Sano curated the exhibit.

"It’s one of the earliest steps that mankind took towards a civilized society.”

The exhibit features ancient pieces, all the way to very edgy, modern pieces.

Jack Morgan

The McNay Art Museum is turning 60 years old, and is celebrating in a way contrasting its age--by doing something edgy. I spoke to the McNay’s Rene Paul Barilleaux.

"We decided to create a kind of Pop-Up Installation that would be new art by San Antonio artists. I selected six artists who represent different ways of working, different kinds of subjects, different kinds of materials.”

Those six artists represent very different styles. But if you want to see them, you really ought to hurry.

Corita Kent's silkscreens were once compared to Andy Warhol's; her banners and posters were featured at civil rights and anti-war rallies in the 1960s and '70s; she made the covers of Newsweek and The Saturday Evening Post; and she even created a popular postage stamp. Yet today, Kent seems to have fallen through the cracks of art history.

Spend An Evening At The Briscoe

Dec 31, 2014
Kasey Rives

On Thursday, January 22, you're invited to spend an evening strolling the galleries of the Briscoe Western Art Museum, enjoying light refreshments, and learning more about the museum and its special exhibit of student art from across Texas.

Jack Morgan

It’s been a busy year all around, and that includes art in San Antonio. TPR’s Arts and Culture Reporter Jack Morgan looks back at the year that was.

Stories on arts and culture in the San Antonio area are probably a bigger deal than in most cities. Why? Because they really do matter here. It’s in the city’s collective DNA. Or, as county judge Nelson Wolff puts it:    

“San Antonio is in the middle of a cultural renaissance.”

The city’s Felix Padron said there’s a reason for this renaissance.

Jack Morgan

You may think the ‘Day of the Dead’ as a celebration around Halloween, but at the Texas A&M Cultural  Arts Center in San Antonio, an exhibit is drawing new attention. I took a tour with its creator. Deborah A. Cortez helps run her family’s Mi Tierra restaurant at Market Square in San Antonio, but she’s also an artist who created this ‘Day of the Dead’ exhibit.

“The exhibit is a story of The Children of the Revolución, which was originally put together by Lionel and Kathy Sosa.”

Bill Fitzgibbons

A new exhibition is opening next month in a national gallery that will feature Texas artists. It’s where that national gallery is that makes this story so fascinating. We spoke to San Antonio artist Bill Fitzgibbons to get the story.

“The National Academy of Art is going to be showing the exhibition called ‘Texas!’  And it opens on Jan. 24.”

And this is in New Delhi, India?

“It’s in New Delhi.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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