Art | Texas Public Radio

Art

San Antonio Business Journal

San Antonio's Urban 15 is about to conduct its yearly call  for talent – you've got it, and they want it. 

"We're looking for a few good men, and women, who like to drum and dance," George Cisneros says.

Catherine Cisneros expanded on the idea.   

"We have noticed there is an incredible amount of talent and training in our community that happens at an early age, and then life catches up with you," Catherine says.

Maria Carstensen

If you're walking in front of the Lila Cockrell Theatre downtown, you'll see an enormous mosaic created by Mexican Artist Juan O'Gorman

Artist Diana Kersey built five towering circular ceramic pieces for VIA's Art in Transit Program at the bustling Five Points area, on Fredericksburg and N. Flores just Northwest of downtown.

Jack Morgan

The American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions helped dedicate four new murals painted on the overpass support structure of Loop 410 at Villamain Road, not far from Mission Espada.

Linda Pace Foundation

Ground was broken Wednesday morning for San Antonio's newest art museum. 

The building was conceived by the late artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who said it came to her in a dream. Its curious name – Ruby City – is explained by the Linda Pace Foundation's Rick Moore.

"Ruby City was the reflection of Linda's dream where she envisioned an iconic structure that was deep red," Moore said.

And in typical Pace fashion, she planned for the museum to be a memorable structure.

Progress continues to be made on the San Pedro Creek project and now it's reached a noteworthy milestone. That milestone is in hiring Carrie Brown as the project's public art curator.

Kino Lorber

At Austin’s South By Southwest Film Festival last year, a documentary listed on the schedule caught my eye with its one-word title, “Yarn.”

It’s not often that five year olds get their art displayed in a museum. At the Institute of Texan Cultures, 250 K-12 students from Comal County now have their artwork shown in an exhibit that celebrates the history and heritage of New Braunfels. TPR’s Louisa Jonas reports a lot of work went into the multimedia show.

A couple years ago, artist and illustrator Christoph Niemann felt like he needed to shake things up. "When you do any kind of creative job for a while, you become better ..." he says, "but I think you always become a little bit more predictable."

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Vincent Valdez’s art studio is in an old San Antonio fire station built in 1910. Above the entrance stands a vintage statue of a vigilant fire fighter clutching his ax.

Inside, the art space is taken over by one colossal black and white painting — 43 feet long — broken up into six panels. It’s titled “The City.” It features 14 hooded members of the Ku Klux Klan caught in a candid moment on a bluff overlooking a city at night.

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