Art | Texas Public Radio

Art

Jack Morgan

Three times a year, three different artists converge in San Antonio. One from Texas, one from the U.S. and one from somewhere else in the world come to participate in Artpace’s residency program with one directive: create.  

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Students from underprivileged backgrounds don’t often get to spread their artistic wings in the classroom. There’s a studio in San Antonio’s Westside that’s actually paying young people “to make art all day.”


Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Centro de Artes opens a new exhibit Thursday, June 27 born of a special artistic partnership.   

McNay Art Museum

Escape this weekend's summer heat and dust by appreciating a new take on chamber music, take a stroll through pop culture history or welcome an ambitious new orchestra.

 

Legend has it that when Jacopo Tintoretto was 12 years old, he was so good at drawing that he rattled Titian — the master artist of Venice, 30 years his senior. Young Tintoretto was an apprentice in Titian's workshop and — as the story goes — the old master gone away for several days, and when he came back he found some of Tintoretto's drawings.

Courtesy Vega and Soupe

Two artists share a dream: to create the largest outdoor art gallery in Texas. They've already taken huge strides towards making that dream come true.

Courtesy of Charlotte Anne Lucas

A mural that gave a West Side eatery some of its flavor is now gone. But a new mural unveiled this week recreates some of that original beauty.

A 3-foot-tall silver bunny just set an art world record. Rabbit, by the playful and controversial artist Jeff Koons, sold for more than $91 million at Christie's Auction House — the most for work by a living artist at auction.

Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Events this Mother's Day weekend will fill you with music, a wide variety of artwork and creative writing that celebrates motherhood.

Michael Cirlos

A new art installation downtown grew out of some large black and white pictures by Michael Cirlos, extracted from his book Humans of San Antonio. It's in a spot that’s quite accessible but perhaps not in a place the public would normally visit.

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