Art | Texas Public Radio

Art

Erin King

COVID-19 continues unabated, and the question is: how to get people to change their habits for their own safety? One artist thinks one way might be through art.


Courtesy photo

After months of staying home during the COVID-19 pandemic, San Antonio is slowly reopening. Residents are eager to enjoy the arts, culture and entertainment of Countdown City. As more people venture out of their homes, museums and venues are helping patrons stay safe.

Here's how you can engage with the local arts community in safe way:

What a time to be a penguin.

First, a group of the flightless birds were recently allowed to roam the halls of Chicago's Shedd Aquarium — a through-the-looking-glass moment if there ever was one.

Now, penguins visited a museum for a "morning of fine art and culture."

A "For The Taking" box in Southtown.
Ethel Shipton

The coronavirus crisis recently inspired a San Antonio artist to build something practical to help any neighbors in need. 


Rafael Gonzales, Jr.

If you're having a hard time seeing anything remotely funny about the COVID-19 crisis, we’ve found something that might at least give you an unexpected smile or two. It comes from Rafael Gonzales, Jr., whose career work isn't terribly humorous.


Ramin Samandari

COVID-19 is affecting everyone, and in the world of arts, artists and art instructors are being hit particularly hard. Texas Public Radio spoke to an artist who is down, but not out.

Ramin Samandari is a photographer, portrait artist and teacher of photography. His Magical Realism photography studio dates back to the days of film developing. He’s moved on to digital photography but remembers the magic of watching images appear slowly on paper in the darkroom.

Dominic Anthony / Texas Public Radio

The works of two San Antonio-area artists are elevated to a national stage by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C.

Texas Public Radio’s Dominic Anthony and Jack Morgan profile the iconic artists and their lasting legacies.

 


Stock Show Western Art Committee

More than 2 million people go to San Antonio's Rodeo each year to watch bucking broncos, thrill to carnival rides and hear live music. But each year there's also a contest that quietly recognizes talents that don't require a saddle or throwing a lariat. It’s called the Student Western Art Contest.


From Texas Standard:

Alfredo Ramos Martínez might not be a household name, but he made a significant impact on the modern art world in Mexico.

Now, one of his paintings is the inspiration for an exhibit opening Sunday at the Dallas Museum of Art called "Flores Mexicanas: Women in Modern Mexican Art."

A lot of my free time is spent doodling. I'm a journalist on NPR's science desk by day. But all the time in between, I am an artist — specifically, a cartoonist.

I draw in between tasks. I sketch at the coffee shop before work. And I like challenging myself to complete a zine — a little magazine — on my 20-minute bus commute.

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