The American Homefront Project | Texas Public Radio

The American Homefront Project

Kyle Cope / U.S. Air Force

In response to a string of suicides in the Air Force, every base is holding a one day stand down, where airmen can learn and talk about mental health issues.

 

The U.S. Air Force is making an effort to combat rising rates of suicide in its ranks through a mandatory one day "stand down" at every base around the country.

Federal law protects the civilian jobs of National Guard and Reserve troops when they deploy. But federal employees allege the government itself doesn't always follow the law.

Inside of a permanent party dorm at JBSA-Lackland, workers rip up carpet as part of their mold remediation efforts.
Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland became the focus of national media attention in late July after a Facebook page, amn/nco/snco, shared photos of rampant mold growth in its technical training dormitories. 


The legislation requires the government to expand fertility coverage for service members and veterans who've suffered war-related reproductive injuries.

Stephanie Colombini / American Homefront

Some VA medical centers have realized that helping vets get back in the game can also help with their recovery.

On a recent afternoon, 26 year-old Mike Monthervil sat in a small room filled with flatscreen TVs, virtual reality headsets, and squishy blue armchairs, He played the latest Need for Speed game on Xbox One.

He was visiting his recreation therapist Jamie Kaplan in his office at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa.

A thousand National Guard troops from Texas will try to address one of the unintended results of President Trump’s immigration crackdown -- traffic jams that are slowing international commerce.

During the eight months they've been deployed at the U.S.-Mexico border, military personnel have had little direct contact with the people at the center of the mission.

Congress is considering legislation to encourage "outdoor therapy" for veterans with injuries or post-traumatic stress. Volunteer groups are already running similar programs in national parks.

 

Raul Guerra was adopted, so his DNA couldn't be matched to blood relatives. Scientists instead turned to an emerging technique that linked his bones to the drinking water in the places he grew up.

Libby Denkmann / American Homefront

Similiar debates have played out elsewhere, as sports stadiums that were originally built as memorials to veterans take on new corporate names.

To help fund a $300 million makeover of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, where the University of Southern California and the NFL's Rams play, USC announced last year it would rename the stadium "The United Airlines Memorial Coliseum."

But not everyone is happy about the name change, which has drawn increasing public attention in recent weeks.

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