Alzheimer's disease | Texas Public Radio

Alzheimer's disease

Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Symphony will perform Hollywood Hits this Friday at the Tobin Center. Before they do, they’ll perform the show for a special crowd: people with dementia and their caregivers. 

It’s part of the Memory and Music program at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases. The Symphony and the Tobin Center welcome those with dementia and their caregivers to certain rehearsals so they can enjoy the music in an environment more suited to their needs.


The Alzheimer's Association hopes to determine if lifestyle changes can delay brain changes that lead to cognitive decline.
NIH Image Gallery http://bit.ly/2IEO8D3

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that by 2060 the number of Latinos age 65 and older is expected to nearly quadruple, and Latinos will face the largest increase in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias cases of any racial/ethnic group in the United States.

Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

A choir concert at a San Antonio senior living community brings holiday cheer to the audience, but for the singers, performing is a comfort and a joy.


sarcifilippo from Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2YukDGV

15 million Americans provide daily, unpaid care for a family member with dementia. Earlier this summer, San Antonio became one of three Texas cities with an official "dementia friendly" designation.

What's being done to improve quality of life for people living with dementia and the individuals who care for them?


Mahadevan et al., 2019 / University of Texas at San Antonio

A San Antonio researcher hopes to eventually get 100,000 people to enroll in a first-of-its-kind study on cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s, and anyone who doesn’t mind wearing a fitbit can volunteer.

From Texas Standard:

The U.S. population is aging, and many older adults have, or will have, some form of dementia. Right now, the health care workforce is not prepared to meet their needs, says sociologist Christopher Johnson. But Johnson is particularly poised to help fix the problem, as professor at the country's first master's of science program in dementia and aging studies, at Texas State University in San Marcos.

Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Tucked inside a nondescript building in a residential neighborhood in northwest San Antonio is a little cafe. However, here the coffee doesn't come in Italian sizes, and the guests provide the music. Welcome to a memory cafe.

In the U.S., older people with dementia are usually told they have Alzheimer's disease.

But a range of other brain diseases can also impair thinking and memory and judgment, according to scientists attending a summit on dementias held Thursday and Friday at the National Institutes of Health.

These include strokes, a form of Parkinson's disease and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, an estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's.

This number includes an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have early-onset Alzheimer's. One in 10 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer's dementia.

As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the number of new and existing cases of Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer's Association hopes to determine if lifestyle changes can delay brain changes that lead to cognitive decline.
NIH Image Gallery http://bit.ly/2IEO8D3

The Alzheimer's Association is preparing to launch a study to see if lifestyle changes in older Americans can stave off the development of dementia.

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