aging | Texas Public Radio

aging

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A San Antonio researcher wants to know if two medicines many people already take could improve people's quality of life as they age. 


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Research shows friendships can make you healthier and happier, while loneliness is a risk factor for early mortality. What biological mechanisms mediate our ability and desire to connect with others?


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Five San Antonio nursing homes were flagged for alleged instances of abuse and neglect of their residents.  


Cyle Perez / TPR

It’s no secret that the U.S. population is aging rapidly. No one is immune. And with aging comes frailty, disease, disabilities, memory loss and more. But what if life could be lived with vigor and vitality throughout your lifespan? What if you could grow older in a healthy and wholesome manner? That’s the goal of UT Health’s Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the subject of this Think Science presentation, held on August 16, 2019. Dr.

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An aging generation of baby boomers, longer average life expectancy and a lack of available resources are contributing to what's being called an impending "senior-care crisis."


Kathy West Studios

San Antonio researchers will experiment with older baboons to see if new drugs can help ease the challenges that come with getting older. Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute hope the medicines will reverse cognitive decline and memory problems in older people.


From Texas Standard:

The so-called silver tsunami – the idea that as America's Baby Boomer generation ages, the country will change dramatically as a result – will likely affect our economy as well as our health care system, and other things. So what's being done to prepare for it?

The number of veterans in the VA healthcare system who are 70 or older is expected to grow 30 percent in the next eight years.

To age well, we must eat well. There has been a lot of evidence that heart-healthy diets help protect the brain.

The latest good news: A study recently published in Neurology finds that healthy seniors who had daily helpings of leafy green vegetables — such as spinach, kale and collard greens — had a slower rate of cognitive decline, compared to those who tended to eat little or no greens.

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A state law that took effect this month sets new standards to protect older adults from financial abuse.

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