2020 Election | Texas Public Radio

2020 Election

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Presidential candidate Julián Castro says too many lives have been cut short by a broken police system. The former Housing Secretary hopes to fix that system in his newest policy proposal revealed Monday.

Flickr/Keith Ivey

When Texans head to the polls on Super Tuesday in 2020, the act of voting could be very different. Texas lawmakers are looking at bills to cut property taxes and boost school spending, and they're also looking at ways to secure elections in the state, particularly with Senate Bill 9. 


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

President Donald Trump's re-election campaign faces a crowded field of Democrats who want to challenge him for the presidency. Among them is Julian Castro. The former San Antonio mayor and secretary of U.S. Housing and Urban Development is not a household name. But he is working to change that.

From Texas Standard:

More than a dozen Democrats are running for president, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang is one of them. He's the first Asian-American Democrat to run for president, and highlights of his platform include giving every American $1,000 a month, and solving the "fake news" problem.

From Texas Standard:

At 4:30 a.m. El Paso time Thursday, Beto O'Rourke confirmed, in a video with his wife at his side, that he's tossing his hat into the ring, so to speak, and running for president. O'Rourke is one of 15 Democrats who've announced their candidacy so far. 

Richard Pineda is an associate professor in the Department of Communication and director of the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies at the University of Texas at El Paso. Pineda says though O'Rourke will be up against another Texan in the primaries, Julián Castro, O'Rourke is "head and shoulders above" him because of the support he generated during his 2018 Senate race.

Democratic candidates in the 2020 presidential election are already crisscrossing the country, trying to gain traction ahead of next year’s primaries.

From Texas Standard:

The Democratic campaign arm for the U.S. House announced Monday they'll be investing money and resources into trying to flip several congressional districts in Texas blue. Many of these districts encompass the state's rapidly growing commuter cities. While few things are certain about 2020 right now, it's all but guaranteed there will be a partisan war for Texas's suburbs – and some of these Republican bellwethers are showing signs of becoming less red.

The Democratic presidential field is big.

Updated 12:54 p.m. ET

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro formally launched his bid for president on Saturday, after weeks of hinting he was ready to join the growing 2020 Democratic primary field.

Castro said, "I've always believed with big dreams and hard work anything is possible in this nation."

Marilynn Leggio, 71, brought her teenage granddaughter with her to an Elizabeth Warren rally in Council Bluffs, Iowa, last Friday evening.

Leggio says she has "no doubt" the Massachusetts senator would do a "good job" as president, but given Hillary Clinton's loss in 2016, she's not sure whether the country will take a chance on another woman in 2020.

"I think there's a lot of men out there that would never vote for a woman," said Leggio. "I hate to say that, but I think that. Especially a woman that's strong, very opinionated. I think a lot of men think she's pushy."

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