The Source | Texas Public Radio

The Source

Monday-Thursday from noon-1 p.m. on KSTX

The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to call and connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The Source seeks to give life, context and breadth to the events and issues affecting San Antonio by bringing newsmakers and experts to the public, and highlighting the people being affected by the news of the day.

Hosted by veteran journalist David Martin Davies, and produced by Kim Johnson and Dallas Williams.

Tune in to The Source for insightful discussion and analysis on topics that matter to residents of the Alamo City.

Support for The Source comes from contributors to the Community Engagement Fund, including The Gladys and Ralph Lazarus Foundation.

Contribute to the conversation:

  • Call us at: (210) 614-8980 during the show
  • Leave a voicemail at (210) 615-8982 anytime. Submissions may be played on-air
  • Tweet questions to:  @tprsource
  • E-mail comments to:  thesource@tpr.org

Got an idea for a show or want to suggest a must read? CLICK HERE 

Be sure to note if you have extensive experience or expertise on a particular show topic and include your phone number as we may call you for more information on your comment or story.

Chris Eudaily / TPR

A follow-up on last week’s program about being banned from city hall. First an extended interview with City Attorney Michael Bernard and then the ACLU sounds off on the right to petition the government. Finally, Evita Mendiola, the spokesperson for Haven for Hope talks about how the cold weather affects the homeless in San Antonio.

Office of the City Attorney

San Antonio City Attorney Michael Bernard is standing by the ban he’s placed on John Foddrill and Michael Cuellar. The two are not allowed to go to City Hall or attend city council meetings. 

Foddrill and Cuellar are two former San Antonio city employees who were both fired from their posts; both men claim they have found evidence of waste in the city government.

Chris Eudaily / TPR

The public square is the cornerstone of democracy. The concept is that anyone can hop on a metaphorical soapbox and air their grievances about the government.

But what does it take to be banned from the public square in San Antonio?

It’s happening to two local residents who are being shunned by their elected representatives. John Foddrill and Michael Cuellar are two separate cases but with some suspicious common factors. Both men are former city employees who say that while on the job they found evidence of fraud or waste in city government.

Marathon Maniac Larry Facebook Page

The last year saw the rise of the Latino vote in the 2012 election and San Antonio local "Marathon Maniac" Larry Macon break the World Record for marathons in a year -- he finished with 157. So what will happen in 2013?

Chris Eudaily / Texas Public Radio

The Mexican revolution drove people into the United States and those that settled in South Texas helped shape the cultural and economic landscape of the area. This is especially notable as the Hispanic population continues to increase in the United States, and the country -- as Mayor Julián Castro put it --  begins to look like San Antonio. The last part of the show highlights a performance of Tchaikovsky’s "The Nutcracker," a production that is a holiday tradition in San Antonio and the U.S.

Geekdom is celebrating its first anniversary and is looking to the future of continued growth and innovation. Local pre-K book series Arte Kids has become a national hit by using San Antonio's bi-lingual and bi-cultural roots.

Center for Refugee Services Facebook page

Their accounts of violence, oppression, and danger will astonish you, but not more than their determination to survive and thrive. Every year, San Antonio sees hundreds of refugees settled in the city. Strangers in a strange land - how well are these lost people getting along?

A special project from the UTSA Advanced Policy Social Work masters class wanted to find out – and inform the city.

SH 130 Concession Co.

The new Texas State Highway 130 toll road extension is now open and charging motorists to enjoy it’s privatized asphalt while pushing their speedometers to 85 mph. It’s the fastest stretch of legal driving in the nation.

Also known as the Pickle Parkway, it’s the first public-private partnership highway in Texas, but according to opponents the partnership allows the private company to shoulder very little risk, and instead puts taxpayers on the line to pay for such risks as uncollected tolls.

Pro Toll Road:

Paul Flahive / Texas Public Radio

San Antonians are heading to the polls to vote for candidates in a number of races and the Pre-K 4 SA proposal – to raise the sales tax one eighth of a cent to pay for a full day pre-kindergarten program that proponents say will help turn around the city’s dropout problem.

Mayor Julián Castro is the biggest supporter for Pre-K for SA and says it’s not a silver bullet, but a big step in the right direction.

Bexar County Commissioner Kevin Wolff opposes the proposal  because it raises taxes and he says there are too many unanswered questions.

State of Texas District Viewer

Republican Francisco "Quico" Canseco is mounting his first defense of the seat he won two years ago from Ciro Rodriguez. The Democrats want to put this massive district back in the blue column, and State Representative Pete Gallego of Alpine is their nominee.

The 23rd Congressional District is seen as Republican-leaning and is massive – starting in San Antonio and reaching all the way west just shy of El Paso, stretching hundreds of miles along the Texas-Mexico border.

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