The Source | Texas Public Radio

The Source

Monday-Thursday from noon-1 p.m. on KSTX

The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to call and connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The Source seeks to give life, context and breadth to the events and issues affecting San Antonio by bringing newsmakers and experts to the public, and highlighting the people being affected by the news of the day.

Hosted by veteran journalist David Martin Davies, and produced by Kim Johnson and Jan Ross Piedad.

Tune in to The Source for insightful discussion and analysis on topics that matter to residents of the Alamo City.

Support for The Source comes from contributors to the Community Engagement Fund, including The Gladys and Ralph Lazarus Foundation.

Contribute to the conversation:

  • Call us at: (210) 614-8980 during the show
  • Leave a voicemail at (210) 615-8982 anytime. Submissions may be played on-air
  • Tweet questions to:  @tprsource
  • E-mail comments to:  thesource@tpr.org

Got an idea for a show or want to suggest a must read? CLICK HERE 

Be sure to note if you have extensive experience or expertise on a particular show topic and include your phone number as we may call you for more information on your comment or story.

HelenCobain/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2CFgHuS

Wednesday at noon on "The Source" — San Antonio has been at the forefront of trying to facilitate responsible payday lending practices, but the process hasn't been easy.

Public Domain/Pixabay http://bit.ly/2TzH0bf

There are more than 30,000 young people in Bexar County between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. This demographic represents about 14 percent of their age group in the area. 


Public Domain/Pixabay http://bit.ly/2UQihBg

Peter Sagal's memoir, "The Incomplete Book of Running," is also a field guide to life. What can the sport teach you about survival? 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14353667207

Sixty-four percent of Texans support laws protecting gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination, according to the Public Religion Research Institute.

Yet a new report from Equality Texas details the many obstacles that still remain for nearly 1 million LGBTQ+ individuals living in Texas. What can policy do to change the future of equality in the state? 


Pexels CC0 http://bit.ly/2Ofo1BP

Over seven decades and three generations, women faced contempt, physical violence and even prison time for demanding equality. 

2020 will mark the centennial anniversary of women achieving the right to vote. What can we learn from the suffrage movement? Nearly 100 years later, what inequalities are women still working to overcome?

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