Fronteras | Texas Public Radio

Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Presented by Texas Public Media, "Fronteras" explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.  "Fronteras" airs on Texas Public Radio stations, can be streamed at tpr.org or downloaded as a podcast.

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Courtesy of Norma Elia Cantú

The newest novel by a self-described daughter of the borderlands, Norma Elia Cantú, isn’t a memoir or autobiography, even though it draws on her own personal experiences.

Cabañuelas” documents Cantú’s young adult life when she sets off to Spain in 1980 to study the country’s culture — specifically, its fiestas. Cantú reflects on Spanish traditions and compares it to South Texas communities that were conquered by Europeans centuries ago.

Ester Hernández

Originally aired April 12, 2019

Chicana feminists faced obstacles entirely their own during the Chicano movement. Fellow Chicanos and white feminists upheld a racial, sexist and classist barrier between them, but many remained determined to make their voices heard. Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era is a new collection of essays that shares the stories of these lesser-known activists. 


United Tacos of America, El Rey Network

Tacos are a staple food of Hispanic culture, especially in a city like San Antonio that prides itself on their breakfast taco scene compared to other Texas cities. A new TV series is taking it a step beyond the eggs and chorizo wrapped in flour or corn tortilla. 

Two taco journalists are exploring the story, memory and culture behind the taco and how certain regions have become famous for their cooking methods.

Mando Rayo is co-host of the United Tacos of America.


Lauren Markham is a writer and reporter based in Berkeley, Calif. Her work has been featured on multiple outlets, including The Guardian, Harper’s, Orion, Guernica, VICE, Pacific Standard, The New Yorker.com and VQR, where she is a contributing editor.
Ben Guccciardi

Senior White House adviser Stephen Miller was recently exposed of sending emails to the far-right media outlet, Breibart, in which he recommended the website write about the 1973 French novel, “The Camp of the Saints.” The controversial novel pushes the theory that minorities are replacing and ultimately destroying white civilization — “the great replacement” myth.

These are the same myths writer and journalist Lauren Markham has aimed to tackle throughout her writing. She has worked with refugees and immigrants for over a decade and has written about migration stories and migration myths.


Penguin Randomhouse

Driven by curiosity, shaped by the streets of her native town of Macún, Puerto Rico, and grounded by the responsibility of being the eldest of 11 children, Esmeralda Santiago’s childhood on the island was abruptly uprooted when her mother moved her and her siblings to New York. 

Santiago caught up with Fronteras earlier this month when she was in town to mark the 35th anniversary of the Puerto Rican Heritage Society. Her three memoirs — “When I Was Puerto Rican” (1993), “Almost a Woman” (1999) and “The Turkish Lover” (2004) — and her other work remains wildly popular today. 


Courtesy of Marcus Huerta, UTSA

Conserving historic sites goes beyond protecting a physical structure. Heritage preservation takes into account the identities and values that bind people to places. It is an ongoing effort in a city that’s best known for its historical significance. The University of Texas at San Antonio has been exploring over 300 years of cultural heritage in South and Central Texas. 

William Dupont and Angela Lombardi, Ph.D, said the Alamo City is a prime location for their heritage preservation research, with its deep historical roots intertwined with a rich culture that defines the city.

Tom Pich

The two surviving members of Las Tesoros de San Antonio recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to receive the nation’s highest honor in folk and traditional arts.

Blanquita “Blanca Rosa” Rodriguez and Beatriz “La Paloma del Norte” Llamas were honored as 2019 NEA National Heritage Fellows and the two show no signs of slowing down.

Harry Gamboa Jr.

Inner demons, passions and life transformations are all recurring themes of one of the most iconic artists from the Chicano street art movement. Carlos Almaraz was one of Los Angeles’ leading contemporary artists, but his life was cut short when he died of complications from AIDS in 1989.

Elsa Flores Almaraz is working to keep her late husband’s work and legacy alive. The new documentary, “Carlos Almaraz: Playing with Fire,” highlights the significant moments in Carlos’ life and how these memories transcend in his artwork. 

Fabian+Echevarria

Pursuing a comedy career comes with challenges all its own, but as an openly gay entertainer in the 1980s, Marga Gomez had an additional set of hurdles to overcome. “Latin Standards” is Gomez’s 12th solo show.

Plus, San Antonio’s American Indians bring attention to the recent discovery of human remains on the property of the Alamo.

Josh Huskin

Were the Jurassic Park raptors just misunderstood? Who’s in the Regina George circle of friends? When did Michael B. Jordan break your heart into the most pieces?

It’s unlikely these are common afterthoughts to some of the most well-known films in mainstream media. But these questions and 27 others are answered and illustrated in Movies (and Other Things), the latest book from San Antonio native and author Shea Serrano.


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