Fronteras | Texas Public Radio

Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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Laurie Cook Heffron, a licensed social worker and professor of Social Work at St. Edward’s University in Austin, is co-author of the study “Latina Immigrant Women and Children’s Well-Being and Access to Services after Detention” with licensed psychologist, Gabriela Hurtado and Josie Serrata of Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network for Health Families and Communities.

Central American women and children seeking asylum in the U.S. often encounter a whole other level of trauma along their voyage. A new study documents the experiences previously detained women faced and the professionals who work with them.

Then, a recent UTSA graduate shares his path of pursuing a bachelor's degree after his mother was unexpectedly deported.


Eli Reed

Latinos have fought in every U.S. conflict, but an accurate number of how many served is still unknown.

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez founded the Voces Oral History Project. For the past two decades, Voces has explored the stories of Mexican-Americans who defended the U.S., both overseas and on the home front, filling the gaps in this piece of American history.

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez

The Voces Oral History Project marks its second decade in 2019. The project’s founder, Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, said they’ve “gotten very fancy” in the last 20 years.


Courtney Campbell / University of Texas at San Antonio

The concept of “living off the land” is somewhat unthinkable now with pre-packaged foods readily available, but native populations did this for centuries. Rebel Mariposa and Beto De León discuss the farm-to-table movement and how popular Texas cuisines have deep indigenous ties. (00:41)

Then, a collection of papers from Diana Kennedy makes its way to San Antonio. (15:27)

Courtney Campbell/University of Texas at San Antonio

Rebel Mariposa is an indigenous woman who is chef and owner of La Botánica, a vegan restaurant in San Antonio that embodies indigenous traditions from the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and New Mexico. She helped design the menu for a benefit gala to benefit American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions, a nonprofit that works to preserve the indigenous traditions of the peoples of South Texas.

SVREP

Lydia Camarillo, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, plays a key role in developing SVREP’s nonpartisan voter mobilization efforts.  

LIFE Magazine

A lawsuit against the Texas Secretary of State David Whitley was recently settled after his office released a list of 95,000 voters accused of being non-citizens. Latino voters who were on the list and several civil rights organizations filed the suit, including the Southwest Voter Registration Project.

Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

President Donald Trump has long touted the need for a U.S. southern border wall. The years-long debate has drawn comments from both sides of the aisle, as well as from the communities who call the international border home. But there’s more to the vast and diverse region than meets the eye.

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

On the U.S. southern border where political tensions fuel the discussion on immigration, world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma took his music to one South Texas city to celebrate the cultural connections between the two nations.

Then, Rita Moreno has held a strong presence on stage and on screen in her career that spans over several decades, and she has no intention of slowing down.

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