The American Homefront Project | Texas Public Radio

The American Homefront Project

The American Homefront Project features reporting on military life and veterans issues.

We're visiting bases to chronicle how troops are working and living. We're meeting military families. We're talking with veterans to learn about the challenges they face. We cover major policy issues at the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs, and we report on family issues service members and veterans experience in their daily lives. From the youngest military recruits to the veterans of World War II, we're reporting in-depth stories about Americans who serve.

Funding for The American Homefront Project comes from The Corporation for Public Broadcasting

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Jonathan Ahl | The American Homefront Project

A recent report found that military law enforcement often mishandles domestic violence on base, leading to fewer prosecutions and ongoing danger for people who are abused. Some abused spouses complain that they’re not taken seriously and say the process favors the service member.


The Pentagon is preparing for potential missions in newly navigable Arctic seas, raising hopes the military will reinhabit a long-abandoned Navy base on an Alaskan island.

For the first time in decades, veterans and local military families have access to a final resting place alongside fellow servicemembers in the city of Los Angeles.

The famous structure and popular tourist site will undergo a renovation project that's expected to last almost four years.

The Pentagon says reported cases of heat exhaustion jumped nearly 50 percent between 2014 and 2018.

A growing number of programs try to treat PTSD by getting veterans into nature, even deep under the sea. But there's little scientific evidence that treatments like "scuba therapy" work.

The $325 million dollar plan is funded by private companies and is expected to result in renovations to 16,000 homes on seven Army posts.

Carson Frame / TPR News

The Department of Veterans Affairs is reaching out to clergy members who may find themselves counseling veterans in crisis or need. It now holds training sessions for religious leaders all over the country. One of the goals is to teach them to look for signs of psychological disorders and other issues among veterans in their congregations. 

 


Kyle Cope / U.S. Air Force

In response to a string of suicides in the Air Force, every base is holding a one day stand down, where airmen can learn and talk about mental health issues.

 

The U.S. Air Force is making an effort to combat rising rates of suicide in its ranks through a mandatory one day "stand down" at every base around the country.

Federal law protects the civilian jobs of National Guard and Reserve troops when they deploy. But federal employees allege the government itself doesn't always follow the law.

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