Notorious And Eponymous | Texas Public Radio

Notorious And Eponymous

May 10, 2019

In this game, actor Taylor Schilling and Jonathan Coulton team up for a quiz about peculiar things named after real people.

Heard on Taylor Schilling: Orange Is The New Clown.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

While Abby and Errik get ready for the final round, it's time for us to play another game. Please welcome back our special guest Taylor Schilling, everybody.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right. Taylor, Jonathan Coulton...

JONATHAN COULTON: Yes.

EISENBERG: Jonathan Coulton, Taylor...

TAYLOR SCHILLING: Hello.

COULTON: Hello.

EISENBERG: Taylor, you and Jonathan Coulton are going to team up for this quiz which is called...

SCHILLING: OK.

EISENBERG: ...Notorious and Eponymous. I'll ask you multiple-choice questions about peculiar things named for people. And you can consult each other to come up with the answer.

SCHILLING: OK.

EISENBERG: OK. Here we go. In 1561, a diplomat introduced tobacco to the French court, eventually leading to its widespread use in Europe his name was Jean what? - A - Nicot, B - Hookah...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Or C - Cigaret?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: OK. Jean Hookah sounds extremely unlikely.

EISENBERG: Hookah.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Jean - if it were Hyookah (ph)...

EISENBERG: Ookah (ph).

COULTON: Ookah if it was a French...

EISENBERG: Right.

COULTON: But it's not. It's Hookah.

EISENBERG: Hookah - yeah.

COULTON: Yeah. And what was the other one?

EISENBERG: It's Nicot.

COULTON: Oh, like...

SCHILLING: Nicot - what does that have to do with the subject?

EISENBERG: Spelled like N-I-C-O-T.

COULTON: Well, like neecoteen (ph), right?

SCHILLING: Oh, oh, oh.

COULTON: Like, nicotine was named...

SCHILLING: Oh, oh - neecoteen.

EISENBERG: Nicotine.

COULTON: (Laughter).

SCHILLING: Nicot, as in neecoteen.

COULTON: As in neecoteen.

EISENBERG: Or...

SCHILLING: No, no, no. Just call me Nicot. I've got this.

COULTON: And as in nicotine.

EISENBERG: And Cigaret as in...

SCHILLING: That sounds goofy.

COULTON: Well, see. That sounds goofy...

SCHILLING: I'm going to let you go with this one.

COULTON: No. Well, I was going to say...

SCHILLING: It sounds silly.

COULTON: It sounds goofy because that's a cigar - a cigarette as a small cigar.

SCHILLING: Yeah.

COULTON: So there's no way they named a cigar after a larger version of it. That doesn't make any sense.

SCHILLING: I agree with you.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: So we're going to go with Nicot, I guess.

SCHILLING: Nicot.

EISENBERG: Yeah. You're right - Nicot.

SCHILLING: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jonathan, you were right. Jean Nicot's name gave us the word nicotine. In 1866, a British naturalist in Trinidad noticed a creature known as the millions fish. He sent samples to a museum in the U.K. And this fish is now commonly known by his last name. His name was Robert Lechmere what? What Robert Lechmere - A, Swedish? - Robert Lechmere - B, Minnow? - or Robert Lechmere - C, Guppy?

COULTON: The Swedish Fish...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: ...Which they saw everywhere - the candy that everyone saw everywhere.

EISENBERG: I think the right answer is not on here. I think it's the fortune teller.

SCHILLING: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: You know, the little fish...

EISENBERG: Oh, the thing that curls up in your hand.

SCHILLING: The fortune teller fish - oh, I love those. I need one. I need some answers.

COULTON: Which - well - which do you think is more name-y? - Minnow or Guppy?

SCHILLING: They both sound silly.

COULTON: They do.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHILLING: Mr. Guppy (laughter).

COULTON: Mr. Guppy - it's pronounced Guppay (ph).

SCHILLING: Guppay.

EISENBERG: Guppay.

COULTON: (Laughter).

SCHILLING: Mr. Guppay - Mr. Minnow.

COULTON: Mr. Minnow.

SCHILLING: Guppy sounds right.

COULTON: Guppy sounds right to you.

SCHILLING: Guppay - yeah.

COULTON: Guppay.

EISENBERG: Yeah. It's Guppy. You're right.

COULTON: Yes.

SCHILLING: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You're right.

SCHILLING: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: All right. In 1880, Irish farmers wanted an estate manager to lower their rents to help them survive the potato famine. When the manager refused, the farmers retaliated by refusing to interact with him in any shape or form. His name was Charles Cunningham what? - A, Picket, B, Embargo or C, Boycott?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I...

SCHILLING: It just sounds - this is so funny.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It's ridiculous.

COULTON: Embargo sounds bananas as a last name.

SCHILLING: It sounds bananas.

COULTON: It's sounds...

EISENBERG: Charles Cunningham Embargo...

COULTON: Embargo.

SCHILLING: Embargo.

EISENBERG: ...I presume.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHILLING: There's a lot of, you know, espionage.

COULTON: Yeah. It sounds like a spy.

SCHILLING: It sounds like a spy - embargo - embargo.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Embargo Picket?

SCHILLING: Picket sounds right. Picket sounds - what's he - he's a...

COULTON: Picket sounds like a name. Boycott is the other one.

EISENBERG: Or Boycott.

SCHILLING: Yes, Boycott - actually...

COULTON: That actually feels like that could be a name.

SCHILLING: Actually, Boycott, now that I feel it in my mouth, sounds right.

COULTON: It sounds name-y - Boycott.

SCHILLING: Sounds...

COULTON: Like Prescott.

SCHILLING: It's right.

EISENBERG: You're right.

SCHILLING: Yes.

EISENBERG: Charles Cunningham Boycott.

(APPLAUSE)

SCHILLING: There we go.

COULTON: This is going great.

SCHILLING: Yeah.

COULTON: We're doing a great job.

SCHILLING: We're a great team.

EISENBERG: All right. This is your last clue. A 19th-century acrobat pioneered performing in a skin-tight one piece that showed off his kicking bod. His name was Jules what? - A, Singlet, B, Leotard, C, Spandex?

COULTON: OK. It's not Singlet, right?

SCHILLING: It's not Singlet. It could be.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHILLING: Don't you think it's...

COULTON: Well...

SCHILLING: I mean, there's a potential for it to be Singlet.

COULTON: There's potential. But I think it'd be weird coincidence that it's a one piece, and his name happened to be Singlet.

SCHILLING: OK. That's fair.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Right. Like, it all finally came together for him in that one moment.

COULTON: He's like, oh my god. I know what I must do.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHILLING: Yeah. Yeah. That's fair. That's fair. I think it leaves us with Leotard.

COULTON: Leotard - what was the other one?

SCHILLING: Spandex.

EISENBERG: Spandex.

COULTON: It can't be Spandex.

SCHILLING: It can't be - watch it be Spandex.

COULTON: I'm going to be so mad.

SCHILLING: I don't feel like it's going to be Spandex.

COULTON: Leotard sounds right.

EISENBERG: His name was Jules Leotard. Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Yeah.

SCHILLING: Good job.

EISENBERG: And that guy also invented the flying trapeze...

SCHILLING: Wow.

COULTON: Really?

EISENBERG: ...In 1859. There you go.

COULTON: (Laughter).

SCHILLING: Jules was active in circus arts.

EISENBERG: That's right.

COULTON: Sure was.

SCHILLING: He must have been.

EISENBERG: You go to your Yale guy with that little tidbit.

SCHILLING: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yeah, you show him up.

SCHILLING: Singlet. No - Leotard.

EISENBERG: That's right.

SCHILLING: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHILLING: Yes - flying trapeze.

EISENBERG: Jules Leotard. Thank you for playing with us, Taylor. Taylor Schilling stars in "Orange Is The New Black." And her new film is called "Family." Taylor Schilling, everybody.

(CHEERING)

SCHILLING: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.