Journalists In Mexico Trying To Harness The Power Of The Public Following Student Murders | Texas Public Radio

Journalists In Mexico Trying To Harness The Power Of The Public Following Student Murders

Jan 16, 2015

On Fronteras:

-- People in Mexico are tired of government corruption, violence, and of not feeling safe. Mexicans are protesting in ways they haven’t and some journalists are also getting bolder. Get this story from Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter, Lorne Matalon.

-- Some Republicans are trying to change or repeal the Texas Dream Act this legislative session. The Act allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at colleges in the state.

-- We bring you a story about how art is helping refugees in Houston define and share their experiences.

 Stormy On The Southern Front

On Fronteras, we’ve been looking at how media coverage is changing in Mexico after 43 students were killed there. Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter, Lorne Matalon, brought us the story last week. He joins the program this week to tell us more about what he learned from his travels to meet with broadcasters in Mexico.

Is This Dream Ending?

Texas’ new Lt-Gov.-elect, Dan Patrick, has vowed to repeal the Texas Dream Act during the legislative session that recently kicked off in Austin. The Dream Act allows some undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at Texas colleges. Some Republican lawmakers say the Texas Dream Act is another way for the state to be involved in the act of picking winners and losers. And they want the law to change or go away. They’ve already filed bills either to change or repeal the Act. We take a look at the battle ahead.

Report: Border Drones Not Worth Investment

There’s a new report out that says drones used to patrol the border are simply not worth the money. The man behind the report took to C-SPAN’s Washington Journal this week to explain why. Marfa Public Radio’s Travis Bubenik has more.

Art Project Captures Stories Of Houston’s Immigrants

Houston receives more refugees than any other city in the United States, but many of them struggle to find a sense of belonging after relocating. One group is using art to help them capture the stories of their migration. Houston Public Media’s Syeda Hasan reports.
 

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