Fronteras: Remembering Santos Rodriguez; 'The Oval Portrait'; & A Cultural Cookbook | Texas Public Radio

Fronteras: Remembering Santos Rodriguez; 'The Oval Portrait'; & A Cultural Cookbook

Aug 24, 2018

On Fronteras:

  • A 12-year-old Mexican-American boy who was shot and killed by a Dallas police officer is honored with a public art project and documentary (0:21).
  • American writer, poet, and translator Margaret Randall joins us to discuss translating the collection “The Oval Portrait: Contemporary Cuban Women Writers and Artists” (4:55).
  • The University of Texas at San Antonio library has recently featured cookbooks created by housekeeping staff. Here’s why (14:21).

Santos Rodriguez was killed by a Dallas police officer in Dallas on July 24, 1973.
Credit Dallas Mexican American Heritage League

Honest Reflection On Murder Of 12-Year-Old In Dallas' Little Mexico

Forty five years ago, a Dallas police officer shot and killed a 12-year old Mexican-American boy while he sat handcuffed inside a patrol car.

As KERA’s Stella Chavez reports, a public art project and new documentary are remembering Santos Rodriguez and how his death has impacted the Dallas community of Little Mexico.

Credit Wings Press

‘The Oval Portrait’: Translating Cuban Women’s Voices

What happens when you ask 35 Cuban women writers to pen stories in the voice of another character? You end up with the 2016 collection, “The Oval Portrait: Contemporary Cuban Women Writers and Artists.” In each story, the individual authors embody the voice of another woman — real or fictional. It’s a project that captured the attention of poet, writer, and translator Margaret Randall. Her translation of “The Oval Portrait” was published earlier this year.

The chest at the UTSA Libraries Special Collection which contains the Rincón de los Antojos cookbooks.
Credit Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

‘Housekeeper Is Not Their Identity’

When we sit down to a plate of enchiladas or fideo, we often don’t take note of the history behind what’s on that plate. But UTSA does. The UTSA Libraries Special Collections has incorporated a Mexican cookbook collection of over 1,500 titles, including one dating back to 1789.

A recent addition shares recipes from one of the invisible, but ever-present groups of workers at the university.

Norma Martinez can be reached at norma@tpr.org and on Twitter @NormDog1