Classical Power Chords | Texas Public Radio

Classical Power Chords

Jul 19, 2019
Originally published on July 19, 2019 10:59 am

In this audio quiz, classical compositions are paired up with contemporary songs they inspired.

Heard on Bowen Yang And Matt Rogers: I Don't Think So, Honey!

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next game is called Classical Power Chords. Each clue is two audio clips. The first is a piece of classical music. The second is a pop song influenced by the classical piece. Each piece of music you identify is worth one point, and you can tell me the artist or the title.

So Alysa, stay in the lead and you are in the final round. Mike, you need to get more points or Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" will turn into two seasons.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Climate change. Here we go. This clue combines a 19th century German composer and a 20th century rapper.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NAS: (Rapping) B-boys and girls, listen up. You can be anything in the world. In God we trust.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Alysa.

ALYSA O'SHEA: Beethoven.

EISENBERG: That's right. Yeah, the first clip was Beethoven. You want to go for the second clip, Alysa?

O'SHEA: I'm coming up blank. I'm sorry.

EISENBERG: OK. Mike, can you add anything to this?

MIKE RACIOPPA: Nothing.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. So that was Ludwig van Beethoven's "Fur Elise" and Nas' "I Can."

RACIOPPA: Oh, a classic.

EISENBERG: We couldn't. You guys couldn't, but he can. Here's a piece from a Polish-born piano composer and an English rock band.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RADIOHEAD: (Singing) Wake from your sleep.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Alysa.

O'SHEA: Don't know the first one, but Radiohead is the second one.

EISENBERG: Yeah, Radiohead is the second one.

(APPLAUSE)

O'SHEA: Can I take a guess - Chopin?

EISENBERG: Yes, you got it right.

(APPLAUSE)

O'SHEA: Wow.

EISENBERG: Good job. Yes, that was "Prelude No. 4 In E Minor" and, of course, Radiohead, "Exit Music For A Film." All right. This pairing begins with a 19th century Austrian composer and ends with a rock duo from Detroit.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Mike.

RACIOPPA: "Seven Nation Army..."

EISENBERG: Yes.

RACIOPPA: ...Is one of them.

EISENBERG: That's correct.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: How about...

RACIOPPA: The second one...

EISENBERG: ...The name of the other song?

RACIOPPA: Austrian composer - I don't know why I'm saying that because I don't know...

EISENBERG: That's fine.

RACIOPPA: ...Any Austrian composers.

EISENBERG: Well, just name your favorite Austrian composer.

(LAUGHTER)

RACIOPPA: Lady Gaga.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. Good one. Alysa, can you steal?

O'SHEA: Stravinsky?

EISENBERG: Sorry, that is incorrect. That was Bruckner's "Symphony No. 5 In B Flat Major" and, of course - yes - White Stripes, "Seven Nation Army." This is your last mash-up.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LADY GAGA: (Vocalizing).

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mike.

(LAUGHTER)

RACIOPPA: Lady Gaga...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yes, yes.

RACIOPPA: ...And Tchaikovsky?

EISENBERG: No.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: But you got a point there. Alysa, can you steal?

O'SHEA: Bach.

EISENBERG: Yes.

O'SHEA: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

O'SHEA: All right.

EISENBERG: All right, that was Bach's "Fugue No. 24" from "The Well-Tempered Clavier." Well done - tough game. You both did great. And Alysa is going to our final round.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Coming up, we'll have the hosts of the pop culture podcast "Las Culturistas," Bowen Yang and Matt Rogers. They end each show with a list of complaints called I Don't Think So, Honey, so we'll find out what they have against bees. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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