© 2020 Texas Public Radio
Real. Reliable. Texas Public Radio.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Assault, Harassment, Vandalism Against Jews At Near-Historic Levels In The U.S.

Ways To Subscribe
Visitors photograph each other while standing on concrete slabs at the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin in 2016.
NPR
/
Visitors photograph each other while standing on concrete slabs at the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin in 2016.

Antisemitism and far-right nationalism are on the rise around the world, including in the United States. Some of those who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6 openly conveyed antisemitic images and sentiments.

Conspiracy theories about the Jewish people run rampant online, going so far as to assign blame for the spread of coronavirus.

According to a 2020 report from the American Jewish Committee, 88% of Jews considered antisemitism a problem today in the U.S., 37% had been personally victimized by antisemitism within the past five years.

The FBI's latest Hate Crimes Statistics report found that 60.2% of religious bias hate crimes targeted Jews in 2019. As many as six antisemitic incidents occurred every day in that year, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

What's being done to combat hate-based rhetoric online and religiously biased crime? What's to blame for the perpetuation of harmful Jewish stereotypes and misinformation?

Jan. 25-29 is Texas Holocaust Remembrance Week. How do we contextualize the modern-day relevance of this crucial history? How can individuals and communities help curb the spread of antisemitism?

Guests:

  • Alex Newhouse, digital research lead for the Center on Terrorism, Extremism, and Counterterrorism at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies
  • Holly Huffnagle, U.S. Director for Combating Antisemitism with the American Jewish Committee
  • Nammie Ichilov, interim CEO of the Jewish Federation of San Antonio and director of the Holocaust Memorial Museum of San Antonio

"The Source" is a live call-in program airing Mondays through Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. Leave a message before the program at (210) 615-8982. During the live show, call 833-877-8255, email thesource@tpr.org or tweet @TPRSource.

*This interview was recorded on Wednesday, January 27.