Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

Border and Immigration Reporter

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. covers immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border for Texas Public Radio.

Prior to joining Texas Public Radio, Reynaldo was a freelance journalist in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and in New York City. His work has appeared in Public Radio International’s The World and Global Nation, NBC News, NPR’s Latino USA, KUT’s Texas Standard and KUT.

He has an undergraduate degree from Texas State University, where he studied journalism and international studies. Leanos also has a master’s degree from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, where he specialized in international reporting.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy: Ronnie Garza

Texas Public Radio is updating information on COVID-19 in the Rio Grande Valley here. You can find the latest news from TPR in San Antonio here. Other NPR stations that are part of The Texas Newsroom are also live-blogging, including Houston Public MediaKERA in Dallas and KUT in Austin

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, flikr photographer Donna Burton / http://bit.ly/2Bxurr1

Texas Public Radio is updating information on COVID-19 in the Rio Grande Valley here. You can find the latest news from TPR in San Antonio here. Other NPR stations that are part of The Texas Newsroom are also live-blogging, including Houston Public MediaKERA in Dallas and KUT in Austin

NEXU Science Communication via Reuters

Texas Public Radio is updating information on COVID-19 in the Rio Grande Valley here. You can find the latest news from TPR in San Antonio here. Other NPR stations that are part of The Texas Newsroom are also live-blogging, including Houston Public MediaKERA in Dallas and KUT in Austin

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Texas Public Radio is updating information on COVID-19 in the Rio Grande Valley here. You can find the latest news from TPR in San Antonio here. Other NPR stations that are part of The Texas Newsroom are also live-blogging, including Houston Public MediaKERA in Dallas and KUT in Austin

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Texas Public Radio is updating information on COVID-19 in the Rio Grande Valley here. You can find the latest news from TPR in San Antonio here. Other NPR stations that are part of The Texas Newsroom are also live-blogging, including Houston Public MediaKERA in Dallas and KUT in Austin

DJ Beige performs at Red Bull Radio for The Bunker in Detroit, MI, USA on May 21, 2019.
Jeremy Deputat | Red Bull Content Pool

Millions of Americans have had their economic livelihoods upended by COVID-19. 

As positive cases continue to rise in Texas, more cities and counties are taking measures, like restricting mass gatherings and closing businesses to slow the spread of the virus. 


Asylum-seeking children wash their hands at the migrant camp where they live in Matamoros, Mexico on March 17, 2020.
Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

As the U.S. continues to deal with COVID-19, a migrant camp along the southern border in Matamoros, Mexico, across the Rio Grande from Brownsville, Texas,  is also bracing for what could be a deadly outbreak.


Peter O'Dowd / Fronteras

Social visitation is suspended in all U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facilities according to a statement from officials. The agency did not provide further specifics about measures to prevent or mitigate the impact of COVID-19, but said it is “taking important steps to further safeguard those in our care.”

The outside of a MPP court facility in Brownsville is guarded with barbed wire.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Christina Brown is an immigration attorney in Denver, but also represents people on the southern border who are in the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program, which requires migrants to wait in Mexico while their court cases unfold in U.S. immigration court.

Hundreds of asylum-seekers who reach the Texas-Mexico border aren't getting a chance to make their case in U.S. immigration court.

Instead, the migrants — mostly women and children — are put on planes to Guatemala and told to ask for asylum in that country.

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