Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

Border and Immigration Reporter

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. covers immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border for Texas Public Radio.

Prior to joining Texas Public Radio, Reynaldo was a freelance journalist in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and in New York City. His work has appeared in Public Radio International’s The World and Global Nation, NBC News, NPR’s Latino USA, KUT’s Texas Standard and KUT.

He has an undergraduate degree from Texas State University, where he studied journalism and international studies. Leanos also has a master’s degree from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, where he specialized in international reporting.

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Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Migrant dads waiting at a bus station in the Rio Grande Valley likely weren't thinking about how to celebrate Father’s Day this past weekend.  Still, local volunteers tried to make their ongoing journeys more comfortable for them and their families.


Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

The U.S. and Mexico reached an agreement on Friday that was expected to defuse the Trump administration's threat of tariffs on Mexican products. Mexico said it will do more to stop the flow of migrants coming north, which includes immediately expanding the Migrant Protection Protocols across its entire southern border.


Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

Residents, business owners and political leaders in Laredo braced for President Trump’s threat of a 5% tariff on all goods coming from Mexico — that is, until Trump tweeted that Mexican officials “agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of migration.”

The president initially said the tariff would begin June 10 and gradually increase to 25% if Mexico didn’t do more to stop the flow of illegal immigration into the U.S. Instead, Mexico was given 90 days to address immigration and curtail imposed tariffs. 

Mani Albrecht / Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2QBvUB9

Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley is getting its first border barrier. It will stretch 3 miles long and cost more than $43 million.

Wiki Commons http://bit.ly/2B0UmGC
Steve Hillebrand / US Fish And Wildlife Service

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus held a press conference Tuesday afternoon to discuss the death of a migrant minor at the Weslaco Border Patrol station.

Giant tent structures have been erected in Texas to serve as short-term detention facilities to process a huge influx of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The facilities are open Friday in El Paso, Texas, and in the state's Rio Grande Valley next to the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

A large white tent-like structure sits next to the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley on the U.S.-Mexico border.

In recent months, the Department of Homeland Security has been dealing with an influx of unaccompanied minors and family units from Central America arriving at the southern border.

DHS recently announced the agency will expand its border detention facilities in Texas with the opening of two new tent-like structures, which were completed this week.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Two NFL players made a stop in the Rio Grande Valley this week to learn first-hand what is going on at the border and to provide some help to migrant families in both the U.S. and Mexico.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

The acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security continued his tour of immigration facilities along the U.S.-Mexico border on Wednesday.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

More than 76,000 people were apprehended or surrendered on the Southern border in February and administration officials project that number would surpass 100,000 for March.

The highest number of crossings are taking place in Texas' Rio Grande Valley.


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