Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

Border and Immigration Reporter

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. covers immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border for Texas Public Radio.

Prior to joining Texas Public Radio, Reynaldo was a freelance journalist in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and in New York City. His work has appeared in Public Radio International’s The World and Global Nation, NBC News, NPR’s Latino USA, KUT’s Texas Standard and KUT.

He has an undergraduate degree from Texas State University, where he studied journalism and international studies. Leanos also has a master’s degree from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, where he specialized in international reporting.

Ways to Connect

Giant tent structures have been erected in Texas to serve as short-term detention facilities to process a huge influx of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The facilities are open Friday in El Paso, Texas, and in the state's Rio Grande Valley next to the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

A large white tent-like structure sits next to the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley on the U.S.-Mexico border.

In recent months, the Department of Homeland Security has been dealing with an influx of unaccompanied minors and family units from Central America arriving at the southern border.

DHS recently announced the agency will expand its border detention facilities in Texas with the opening of two new tent-like structures, which were completed this week.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Two NFL players made a stop in the Rio Grande Valley this week to learn first-hand what is going on at the border and to provide some help to migrant families in both the U.S. and Mexico.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

The acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security continued his tour of immigration facilities along the U.S.-Mexico border on Wednesday.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

More than 76,000 people were apprehended or surrendered on the Southern border in February and administration officials project that number would surpass 100,000 for March.

The highest number of crossings are taking place in Texas' Rio Grande Valley.


More than 76,000 people were apprehended or surrendered on the Southern border in February and administration officials project that number would surpass 100,000 for March.

The highest number of crossings are taking place in Texas' Rio Grande Valley.

Verónica G. Cárdenas | Texas Public Radio

Hugh Fitzsimons is a rancher and writer. He raises bison at the Shape Ranch in the southwestern part of Dimmit County, about 10 miles away from the Mexican border. He considers his ranch a world apart from the two nations divided by the Rio Grande.


U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

The last week of March ended with immigration officials warning of a migration crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border and a Democratic congressman sharing data indicating more than 50,000 migrants were transported from federal border facilities to San Antonio over the last three months.

Reynaldo Leaños Jr. / Texas Public Radio

Kirstjen Nielsen, the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, visited the Rio Grande Valley Thursday and met with local and state law enforcement. The visit came just days after Border Patrol in the Valley began releasing asylum-seeking migrants from detention, citing overcrowded facilities.

Reynaldo Leanos / Texas Public Radio

President Trump vetoed a congressional measure aimed at blocking his national emergency declaration, and the next battle will likely be in the courts. In the meantime, the plan to extend the border wall in Rio Grande Valley marches forward.

Pages