Randy Anderson | Texas Public Radio

Randy Anderson

Randy was Texas Public Radio's Classical Music Director until 2013 and the longest-serving employee in Texas Public Radio's history. He hosted the very first airshift on KPAC when the station went on the air at 90.9 FM in San Antonio back in November, 1982.

Randy started his career in classical broadcasting at KMFM in the mid-70s, working with one of KPAC's founders, B.J. McClain. The overnight shift was the only full-time job when KPAC first started in 1982 and he was happy to take it.

Randy's first love is painting; he enjoys portraits, landscapes and still lifes, and he spends much of his free time in front of an easel. Great music is a perfect complement to his love for painting and Randy spent years trying to find the perfect instrument. The piano came close, but he eventually realized that his best instrument is a turntable or CD player (or digital library).

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When my wife got home, I showed her the new book "Remembering Glenn Gould" by Colin Eatock, and she remarked “Didn't you have every book about him already”? She had a point there. I thought I had every book and the fact that a new title would be published thirty years after his death and it would be anticipated is a bit different.

Kino Lorber, Inc.

The 1960s and 70s were a time of great experimentation and revolt. New and different were in, and young musicians, artists and filmmakers’ battle cry was “why the hell not?” In a similar vein, a Parisian film maker hired a race driver to tear across Paris in the early morning in a Ferrari at speeds up to 120 mph with a 35mm camera strapped to the hood. In that same go for broke manner the producers of the film “The Girl on a Motorcycle” approached their task. 

Courtesy of TCFHE.

Ingrid Bergman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Spellbound” is in her element as Dr. Petersen; she is beautiful, remote and reticent -- which is to say, Scandinavian. A psychoanalyst at a prestigious institution, Bergman works with her patients and readies herself for the arrival of the new director of Green Manors, a Dr. Edwardes.

Burn It, Blue!

Feb 6, 2012

If you collect DVDs, you probably come across titles that are no longer in print. Netflix won’t rent these, and looking for them online can give you a case of sticker shock--prices can be 8 to 10 times what they cost new. The problem is money: studios gear up for production, and to recoup their investment they have to sell lots of units of a popular film to make a profit. This means that titles with limited commercial value usually don’t reach the market.

Kino Lorber

The Canadian pianist Glenn Gould had a storybook entrance into the concert world. A famous concert in Washington D.C. of highly unusual repertoire (for the time) drew rave reviews, and shortly thereafter an exclusive recording contract with Columbia, one of this country’s biggest labels. Gould’s first release should have left classical listeners cold; he chose to an abstract sleeping pill written by J.S. Bach for a student’s insomniac patron. But surprising everyone, the album became a best seller which has not gone out of print in 55 years.

© Buena Vista Home Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

How does one describe Tim Burton’s film "Ed Wood?" Is it a documentary on the infamous director’s life, a comedy, or a vehicle for some great acting? Happily it succeeds on all three counts. For those of you who don’t know who Ed Wood is, he is a Hollywood legend. Careers have been made panning his films, some calling them the worst ever made.

We’ve all heard the saying, “you are what you eat." Well, we are what we watch as well.

There seems to be a difference in the way we turn out depending on what we watched on TV as kids. Me? I gravitated to the sarcastic, violent mayhem of Warner Brothers cartoons - others felt the gentle pull of Disney programming. I turned out one way and the Disney kids? They are, well, different.

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