Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

NASA

  

We're barely into Spring, but scientists are looking ahead to the Fall, when the moon will pass across the face of the sun and cause a solar eclipse.  Eclipses aren’t that rare…they happen about once a year.  NASA research astrophysicist Nicholeen Viall says the one in August is especially remarkable for the United States. 

Spring Equinox 2017

Mar 21, 2017
NASA

  

  

March 20 was the first day of Spring.  And other than promises of wildflowers and Spring allergies, the Equinox brings with it an astronomical event that only happens twice a year. 

Nicholeen Viall is a research astrophysicist with NASA.  She explains why the equinox is so unique.  “Yeah, so Equinox means in Latin 'equal day and equal night,' and that’s exactly what happened today.  The day and the night are of equal length, and that only happens twice a year – the Fall Equinox and the Spring Equinox.”

Reynaldo Leaños, Jr.

  This week on Fronteras:   

 

·         The Trump administration’s deportation policies reportedly have some unauthorized immigrants fleeing the country to avoid arrest.

 

·         Undocumented parents worried about deportation take action to protect their children in case that happens.

 

·         The ACLU in San Diego files suit against the federal government for detaining immigrants for months without a hearing.

 

·         A look at what happened when Alabama passed a tough immigration law.

BBC News

The BBC is in San Antonio this week to tape an episode of the series, “The Response: America’s Story.”  Producers have been collecting stories about immigration from listeners for a future episode of the program.

San Antonio River Authority

Feral hogs cause $52 million worth of damage to the agricultural industry in Texas, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension.  To help limit property damage, the San Antonio River Authority offers the Feral Hog Management Program to landowners in Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, and Goliad counties.

  

This week on Fronteras:   

 

·         The president’s crack down on undocumented immigrants targets a Houston taco truck owner who was living the American dream.

 

·         Critics of the new travel ban that cuts the number of refugees allowed into the U.S. say it sends the wrong message.

 

·         Marchers in support of President Trump draw protesters.

 

·         Mexico’s Consul General warns Texas has a lot to lose if President Trump revamps NAFTA.

 

·         How dismantling NAFTA would impact avocado sales.

BBC News

The BBC World Service is coming to San Antonio and Texas Public Radio soon, producing the third part of a new series called “The Response: America’s Story.”  They’re covering the first 100 days of the Trump presidency, and the San Antonio episode will be about immigration.  The host for “The Response: America’s Story” is the BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil, and she joined Morning Show Host Norma Martinez from her home in London. 

Photo by Katie Schoolov / KPBS

This week on Fronteras:  

·         Refugees continue to resettle in the U.S.  but struggle to find affordable places to live.

 

·         Ill El Salvadoran woman removed from hospital gets released from Alvarado detention center.

 

·         New Mexico is reassessing how it tests students. Some parents want to see a change.

 

·         Los Vaqueros Rio Grande carry on a 45 year tradition – riding horses from the Mexican border to the Houston Stock Show in honor of Hispanic heritage. 

 

·         Winning on and off the court.  A girls basketball coach scores points with her diverse team of students outside the rim.

 

Lorne Matalon

This week on Fronteras:

  • Mexico may be rethinking its cooperation with the U.S. on security issues due to President Trump's economic threats.
  • Sent home because of the president's travel ban, an Iranian national studying in California finds comfort in the show of support she received.
  • The travel ban is also affecting foreign-born physicians who practice in the U.S.
  • Young immigrants who currently have deportation relief worry that it won't last long.

Kris Arciaga

 

 

  

This week on Fronteras: 

 

·         Mexicans living in the U.S. who send money to relatives back home worry about President Trump’s threats to tax those remittances as a way to pay for his planned border wall.

 

·         Austin schools educate students on how to respond if they encounter Immigration and Custom Enforcement agents.

 

·         A New Mexico Dakota pipeline protester doesn’t feel defeated following a court ruling okaying construction.

 

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