Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

VIA Metropolitan Transit is teaming up with Uber to make sure Fiesta-goers party safely and responsibly.
VIA President and CEO Jeffrey Arndt explains how the partnership works.

Matthew Bowler / KPBS

  

This week on Fronteras: 

·         The founder of the advocacy group Border Angels goes missing in Mexico for more than four days and survives.

·         Our southern neighbor considers boycotting U.S. corn because it feels the Trump Administration is anti-Mexico.

·         How Republicans crossed the lines in the long battle over redistricting in Texas.

·         Voices from Mega Corazón – quite possibly the largest poetry event in the world.

Mega Corazón

Apr 21, 2017
Norma Martinez

April is National Poetry Month, and it was marked in San Antonio with what could arguably be called the biggest poetry event in the world - Mega Corazón.

KENS 5 Eyewitness News, a Tegna company

The son of one of the victims of a deadly church bus crash in Uvalde County has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the driver of the pickup truck that collided with the bus.

Norma Martinez

The 1836 siege at the Alamo is probably the most famous battle in Texas history.  But a mostly-forgotten battle that took place 23 years before is arguably the cornerstone of all that followed, including the fall of the Alamo and the bloody Battle of Medina.  A recent event aimed to raise awareness of a missing piece of the Texas history puzzle.


Andrew Schneider

  

This week on Fronteras: 

 

·         Texas cattle ranchers are closely watching President Trump’s actions on NAFTA.

 

·         The mayor of Santa Fe pledges to keep his city immigrant friendly.  

 

·         The wait to become a U.S. citizen can take a very long time for some, not others.

 

·         Many entertainers have taken a stage name but not Texas comedian Aaron Aryanpur, whose father migrated from Iran.   

 

·         House On Mango Street returns to Classic Theater

 

Tricia Schwennesen / Texas Public Radio

A major construction project will require a complete closure of I-35 in northeast San Antonio this weekend.

Texas Public Radio

Charles “Charlie” Duke is a New Braunfels resident who has just happened to have walked on the moon. 

my_southborough via Creative Commons

This week on Fronteras:   

·         A federal judge rejects requests by federal agents to detain prisoners while their immigration status is checked.

·         San Diego leaders get a direct say in Mexican legislation pertaining to immigration.

·         What schools can and can’t do to accommodate students practicing their religious faiths.

·         Four UTSA students cross the Gulf of Mexico to Cuba - thanks to their forward thinking teacher.


 

·         The far reaching legacy of the young Texas singer known as Selena.  She died 22 years ago.

Will Mederski

 

This week on Fronteras:   

 

·         The U.S. Border Patrol enlists Trans-Pecos Pipeline workers to help catch drug smugglers.

 

·         The Department of Homeland Security is accepting bids to build President Trump’s proposed U.S. –Mexico Border Wall.

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