Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Josh Huskin

Were the Jurassic Park raptors just misunderstood? Who’s in the Regina George circle of friends? When did Michael B. Jordan break your heart into the most pieces?

It’s unlikely these are common afterthoughts to some of the most well-known films in mainstream media. But these questions and 27 others are answered and illustrated in Movies (and Other Things), the latest book from San Antonio native and author Shea Serrano.


Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

What exactly does “Hispanic” mean? To whom does that term apply? Would “Latino” be preferable? What about “Mexican American,” or “Chicano”?


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

A happy, young 12-year-old girl living in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, sees her life upended when her family emigrates across the border to El Paso. Though the move was from one border town to another, the culture shock brought emotional and physical trauma that she’d carry throughout her life.

Una Voz Desatada (A Voice Unbound): The Art, Writings and Trauma of an Immigrant Child” is a posthumous exhibit of the life of Rocío Alvarado.


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio City Council set out to select three out of nine scooter companies to operate in the Alamo City as early as Oct. 1. But the selection has not yet been made. So now what?


Courtesy of Brownsville Historical Association, Brownsville TX

Hateful language directed at people of color has a long, dirty history in the U.S. and along the border.

Mexicans and Mexican Texans living along the border in the 1800s were frequently described as greasers, monsters, demons, bandits, and criminals -- not just by Anglo Americans newly settled on the border but also by journalists who were telling faraway readers about the supposed lawlessness and backwardness of the borderlands. Just being Mexican could get you killed. That’s a fear many Hispanics have today, especially after the Aug. 3 mass shooting in El Paso.


There’s a rich, but often unexplored, piece of Texas history along the state’s southern and southwestern corridors. Settlers arrived in the Rio Grande Valley hundreds of years ago, and the people of color — who called the region home long before the newcomers — became targets of racism. The discrimination these populations endured is still having an effect on minority communities today.

Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez explores this piece of Texas history in the book “River of Hope: Forging Identity and Nation in the Rio Grande Borderlands.”


Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Hispanic Heritage Month comes a little over a month after an act of violence targeting Mexicans and Mexican Americans claimed 22 lives in El Paso. Activists want communities across Texas and the U.S. to have more profound observations to elevate Hispanic history and culture.

Tony Diaz, a Houston-based writer, says the rich culture should not be recognized and appreciated for just 30 days, but all year long.

Al Rendon

On Fronteras:

  • The Strong Heart Study has tracked the heart health of Native American populations since 1988. (0:00)

  • Family and friends remember Dr. Alfonso Chiscano, MD, a Canary Islands native who championed San Antonio’s culture (11:50).


lenn, who played with Armstrong. Neil DeFeo, trombone. Aug. 31, 2019.
Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

A San Antonio jazz legend was honored by his friends, family, and former bandmates Saturday.


Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Museum of African History and Culture

On the campus of Sul Ross State University Rio Grande College, historical images and posters from the 1960s are mounted on easels and lined up through the halls of the Small Business Development Center. While some passersby may overlook the display, the historical and cultural significance is far from subtle. These collection of images in part of a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

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