Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

Lauren Terrazas

Producer

Lauren Terrazas is an El Paso native and produces "Morning Edition" and "Fronteras" for Texas Public Radio. She began her work in broadcasting as an intern at KTEP, El Paso’s public radio station. While at KTEP, she went to become a production assistant and then chief announcer for "Morning Edition."

Lauren supervised part-time student employees and interns while producing local public affairs programs. She also created KTEP’s first production handbook.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in organizational and corporate communication from the University of Texas at El Paso in 2017 and is currently pursuing her master’s in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

A happy, young 12-year-old girl living in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, sees her life upended when her family emigrates across the border to El Paso. Though the move was from one border town to another, the culture shock brought emotional and physical trauma that she’d carry throughout her life.

Una Voz Desatada (A Voice Unbound): The Art, Writings and Trauma of an Immigrant Child” is a posthumous exhibit of the life of Rocío Alvarado.


Courtesy of Brownsville Historical Association, Brownsville TX

Hateful language directed at people of color has a long, dirty history in the U.S. and along the border.

Mexicans and Mexican Texans living along the border in the 1800s were frequently described as greasers, monsters, demons, bandits, and criminals -- not just by Anglo Americans newly settled on the border but also by journalists who were telling faraway readers about the supposed lawlessness and backwardness of the borderlands. Just being Mexican could get you killed. That’s a fear many Hispanics have today, especially after the Aug. 3 mass shooting in El Paso.


There’s a rich, but often unexplored, piece of Texas history along the state’s southern and southwestern corridors. Settlers arrived in the Rio Grande Valley hundreds of years ago, and the people of color — who called the region home long before the newcomers — became targets of racism. The discrimination these populations endured is still having an effect on minority communities today.

Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez explores this piece of Texas history in the book “River of Hope: Forging Identity and Nation in the Rio Grande Borderlands.”


Courtesy Hotel Emma

One of the most popular hotels in the country is in San Antonio. It's named for a woman most people have never heard of. The woman behind the Hotel Emma ran a prominent brewery in South Texas for nearly two decades through some of the harshest times of the 20th century.

Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Hispanic Heritage Month comes a little over a month after an act of violence targeting Mexicans and Mexican Americans claimed 22 lives in El Paso. Activists want communities across Texas and the U.S. to have more profound observations to elevate Hispanic history and culture.

Tony Diaz, a Houston-based writer, says the rich culture should not be recognized and appreciated for just 30 days, but all year long.

Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Museum of African History and Culture

On the campus of Sul Ross State University Rio Grande College, historical images and posters from the 1960s are mounted on easels and lined up through the halls of the Small Business Development Center. While some passersby may overlook the display, the historical and cultural significance is far from subtle. These collection of images in part of a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

Many El Pasoans are grieving through their own spiritual and religious traditions following the mass shooting at a Walmart that killed 22 people on Aug. 3. 

A memorial outside the store first began as a few flowers and candles but has grown into a massive display of community support. Dozens of posters line the fence above hundreds of religious candles and people continue to share their own methods of comfort. 

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

It’s Sunday afternoon and church-goers shuffled into El Paso’s historic Sacred Heart Parish. Tucked away in Segundo Barrio, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods, the church is a spiritual anchor to the predominantly immigrant community it serves.

Sacred Heart is less than one mile from an international bridge that connects El Paso to its sister city, Ciudad Juárez.

This weekend, there was a different presence of peace as four therapy dogs quietly sat in the back pew, ready to greet parishioners.

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

Calls for uniting America -- and for gun reform -- echoed through the streets of El Paso Saturday. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) organized a march a week after a mass shooting rocked the heavily Latino city.

Courtesy of the Texas General Land Office

Despite being met with opposition, renovation work is underway at the Alamo as the Texas General Land Office plans to restore and recapture the historical 1836 battle.

Karina Erickson, Communications Director with the GLO, said the project aims to elevate the Alamo to the level of the Gettysburg memorial in Pennsylvania.


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