Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

Lauren Terrazas

Producer

Lauren Terrazas is an El Paso native and produces "Morning Edition" and "Fronteras" for Texas Public Radio. She began her work in broadcasting as an intern at KTEP, El Paso’s public radio station. While at KTEP, she went to become a production assistant and then chief announcer for "Morning Edition."

Lauren supervised part-time student employees and interns while producing local public affairs programs. She also created KTEP’s first production handbook.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in organizational and corporate communication from the University of Texas at El Paso in 2017 and is currently pursuing her master’s in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

President Donald Trump has long touted the need for a U.S. southern border wall. The years-long debate has drawn comments from both sides of the aisle, as well as from the communities who call the international border home. But there’s more to the vast and diverse region than meets the eye.

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

On the U.S. southern border where political tensions fuel the discussion on immigration, world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma took his music to one South Texas city to celebrate the cultural connections between the two nations.

Then, Rita Moreno has held a strong presence on stage and on screen in her career that spans over several decades, and she has no intention of slowing down.

Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

World-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday. Laredo’s “Day of Action” featured performances in both cities to celebrate the relationship between the two communities.

Chicanas Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era is a collection of essays written by Chicana scholars and activists about Chicanas who organized and resisted during the Chicano Movement.

Dionne Espinoza, Maylei Blackwell, and Maria Eugenia Cotera edited the book.

Ester Hernández

Chicana feminists faced obstacles entirely their own during the Chicano movement. Fellow Chicanos and white feminists upheld a racial, sexist and classist barrier between them, but many remained determined to make their voices heard. Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era is a new collection of essays that shares the stories of these lesser-known activists. 

San Antonio-based actress Patricia Zamora explores culture, faith, and healing in her one-woman show “Curanderas and Chocolate: Cuentos of a Latina Life”.

Then, Japanese-American survivors of the WWII-era Crystal City camp explore the parallels between today’s asylum seekers and what their families experienced in the 1940s.

 


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio-based actress Patricia Zamora has had a love for acting and theater since she was a child. The yearly runs of The Wizard of Oz on TV had her hooked.

Ben Krantz

Award-winning writer Rudy Ruiz is a native of Brownsville who now lives in San Antonio. His writing employs magical realism, which is inspired by Gabriel García Márquez.

“When you first read his work you were just swept away and escape into this other world,” Ruiz said, “but the more you learn about what he was writing about, you realize he was making a lot of sweeping commentary about the ills that he saw in society, whether it was class-related or...political or the violence in his native country of Colombia.”

Ben Krantz

A Revolutionary-era Mexican soldier who wants to build bridges across the border. A Mexican American girl not allowed to speak Spanish at home speaks in code with her grandfather. These are just a few of the stories award-winning writer Rudy Ruiz included in his 2013 short story collection, “7 for the Revolution.”

Also, Norma Martinez gets a look at a giant tree of life that tells the story of the city’s ranching history.

Harvard University Press

A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture” by Raúl Coronado explores the forgotten print culture that paved the path for individuals who oversaw Texas transform from a Spanish colony to a Mexican republic, to a Texan republic, to one of the United States of America.  

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