Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

Lauren Terrazas

Producer

Lauren Terrazas is an El Paso native and produces "Morning Edition" and "Fronteras" for Texas Public Radio. She began her work in broadcasting as an intern at KTEP, El Paso’s public radio station. While at KTEP, she went to become a production assistant and then chief announcer for "Morning Edition."

Lauren supervised part-time student employees and interns while producing local public affairs programs. She also created KTEP’s first production handbook.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in organizational and corporate communication from the University of Texas at El Paso in 2017 and is currently pursuing her master’s in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Scott Ordway

A new stage production takes a look at humans’ natural instinct to move, specifically, the way people migrate across borders as immigrants and refugees.

Composer Scott Ordway blended chamber music with scenic design and created The Clearing and the Forest.

Central American women and children seeking asylum in the U.S. often encounter a whole other level of trauma along their voyage. A new study documents the experiences previously detained women faced and the professionals who work with them.

Then, a recent UTSA graduate shares his path of pursuing a bachelor's degree after his mother was unexpectedly deported.


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Oscar Cantua was one of 5100 graduates at the University of Texas at San Antonio’s 2019 Spring Commencement. He received an undergraduate degree in physics. It stemmed from an early interest in black holes. But his path to graduation was a rocky one. Oscar, his mother and his older sister left Mexico when he was only five.

Eli Reed

Latinos have fought in every U.S. conflict, but an accurate number of how many served is still unknown.

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez founded the Voces Oral History Project. For the past two decades, Voces has explored the stories of Mexican-Americans who defended the U.S., both overseas and on the home front, filling the gaps in this piece of American history.

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez

The Voces Oral History Project marks its second decade in 2019. The project’s founder, Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, said they’ve “gotten very fancy” in the last 20 years.


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio; UTSA Libraries Special Collections

One of the largest collections of Mexican cookbooks in the nation recently received a donation of archives, letters, and rare Mexican cookbooks from a doyenne of traditional Mexican cuisine.

Courtney Campbell / University of Texas at San Antonio

The concept of “living off the land” is somewhat unthinkable now with pre-packaged foods readily available, but native populations did this for centuries. Rebel Mariposa and Beto De León discuss the farm-to-table movement and how popular Texas cuisines have deep indigenous ties. (00:41)

Then, a collection of papers from Diana Kennedy makes its way to San Antonio. (15:27)

Courtney Campbell/University of Texas at San Antonio

Rebel Mariposa is an indigenous woman who is chef and owner of La Botánica, a vegan restaurant in San Antonio that embodies indigenous traditions from the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and New Mexico. She helped design the menu for a benefit gala to benefit American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions, a nonprofit that works to preserve the indigenous traditions of the peoples of South Texas.

SVREP

Lydia Camarillo, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, plays a key role in developing SVREP’s nonpartisan voter mobilization efforts.  

LIFE Magazine

A lawsuit against the Texas Secretary of State David Whitley was recently settled after his office released a list of 95,000 voters accused of being non-citizens. Latino voters who were on the list and several civil rights organizations filed the suit, including the Southwest Voter Registration Project.

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