Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Jack Morgan

Arts and Culture Reporter

Jack Morgan has spent 35 years in electronic media, doing both television and radio.

In his mid-20s, Jack was known as Robbin Banks at two San Angelo FM stations, but the bulk of his career has been spent at PBS stations in Austin (KLRU), Orlando (WMFE), Vermont Public Television, and San Antonio's KLRN.

At KLRN he spent five years as director of production, where he was responsible for three hour-long programs with the San Antonio Symphony. Jack was also responsible for KLRN's ARTS program during its startup, and co-produced Texas Week With Rick Casey.

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Steve Gilmore

Urban 15 is 100 dancers in bizarre, lit-from-within costumes marching and dancing at the insistent beat of dozens of drummers. Best known from their parade participation, Urban 15 is like nothing you’ve ever seen.

"We like to poke your imagination," says Music and Media Director George Cisneros, who also talked about what the dancers wear, and why it's significant.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

The San Antonio Symphony’s new season starts next week.  The symphony’s Associate Conductor Akiko Fujimoto tells us what to expect this fall.

Jazz 'SA Live

Downtown will be alive with Jazz this weekend as Travis Park is the epicenter for Jazz'SAlive, a live Jazz music event that’s been drawing San Antonians and top flight musicians for the last three decades.

"Strangely enough we have several bands that played in ’83 when this first started," says Executive Vice President of the San Antonio Parks Foundation Judi Deleon.

"We’ve got Small World, we’ve got the Regency Jazz Band, we have Beverly Houston who’s been around a long time, we’ve got such great talent," Deleon says.

Todd Johnson

Open now at Artpace in the upstairs Hudson Showroom is the new exhibit Localized Histories. Artpace’s Deputy Director Mary Heathcott explains the collection's backstory.

"Most central to the exhibition is a work by Artpace’s founder, Linda Pace. Linda Pace worked with assemblage and found objects in her own artwork," she says.

From huge works taking an entire wall, to smaller ones using dimes, nickels and small balls, they’re all comprised of artist-found elements. Then there’s the piece in the center of the room.

Ballet San Antonio

Ballet San Antonio is gearing up for their move into the Tobin next year, but first, there's this season.

"We start with Ben Stevenson’s 'Cinderella' and from there we go into 'The Nutcracker' with the San Antonio Symphony," says Ballet San Antonio’s Executive Director Courtney Barker. "We’re going to be having 'Firebird,' which is an exciting ballet with some mixed repertoire of contemporary works. And then finally we’re going to be doing a free community performance at La Villita."

John Clare / TPR Arts

Some of San Antonio's most able musicians play an instrument we all take for granted.

"I can't tell you how many people tell us how, that when they hear our a capella music, it is what they imagine Angels must sound like," said Copperleaf Quintet Artistic Director and singer Ruth Moreland.

Some of the group's new season, which begins September 29, will be performed primarily at the University of the Incarnate Word's Chapel of the Incarnate Word.

ARTS San Antonio Facebook

ARTS San Antonio’s new season is just around the corner and Executive Director John Toohey says unlike some arts organizations in the city, which have a narrow focus, their niche is in providing a wide style of performance art.

"People come here from all over the world, so we bring performing artists here from all over the world," Toohey says.

So what should San Antonians look for this fall?

Gary O. Smith

A very unusual concert that happens every solstice takes place this Saturday in a very unlikely location.

Celebrating the autumnal equinox, concert-goers head eighty feet down, deep inside the Cave Without a Name, which is near Boerne. Musician Rudi Harst and a makeshift band will play, along with an interesting partner.

"The most important musician in the room is the cave herself," Harst said. "The resonant aspect of the room, and also, the deeply spiritual experience of being deep within mother earth."

Artpace staff

The large glass windows at Artpace’s 445 North Main facility features an unusual new exhibit, with legs ascending from sand piles in the floor, swirling towards the ceiling.

Artist Julia Barbosa Landois describes it:

"There are all these different legs," she says. " They start as these neutral, earthy colors, and they become very vibrant, purples, light blue, turquoise, pink. And then at the top they become reflective, embossed, colored foil."

Matthew Diekman / Camerata San Antonio

Camerata San Antonio begins its next season by taking the show on the road. The popular local Chamber Music ensemble made up of San Antonio Symphony players has been dazzling south Texas audiences for the last decade.

Ken Freudigman, who plays cello in the group, dropped by to talk about their coming programs, starting in Boerne and Kerrville.

"We have music from Benjamin Britten, Béla Bartók, we’re doing some music of Dvořák, Hugo Wolf, music of Brahms and Mendelssohn, all throughout the entire year," he said.

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