Dallas Williams | Texas Public Radio

Dallas Williams

Associate Producer, "The Source"

At first it seemed the global pandemic could be a unifying moment; a universal experience to bring us all together. But with each passing week, the virus is less of a common enemy and more of a magnifying glass for existing inequalities and partisan divides.


The coronavirus pandemic is causing disruptions to food and agriculture supply chains around the world, including in Texas. 


The coronavirus pandemic has many Texans worried about voting in person in the state's mid-July primary runoff election. Mail-in voting could be a gamechanger, especially in a public health crisis -- why is it so controversial? What are the pros and cons of expanding access to absentee voting?


This week on ask the expert, Dr. Berggren answers questions about whether schools should continue wind instrument teaching, if the coronavirus can travel through air conditioning systems and whether the use of facial coverings should be enforced.  


Tortilla chips on a restaurant table at Market Square.
Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Eager to dig the state out of a pandemic-fueled financial crisis, state leaders have given the green light to continue rebooting Texas' economy. Chief among concerns about reopening businesses is that rushing to do so will trigger a second wave of COVID-19 cases. 


COVID-19 has been a disruption of seismic proportions and it's taking a toll not only on peoples' physical health, but their mental well-being. 


The pandemic has upended most all aspects of daily life, including a major shift in where and how work gets done for millions of U.S. employees. While there are perks (no morning commute!), working from home also comes with its own set of unique challenges.


Pregnancy is already a nerve-wracking time for expectant mothers and families, but the coronavirus pandemic is taking this to a whole other level. For many, the momentous experience and joy of new life is overshadowed by fear and uncertainty.


This week, Dr. Ruth Berggren answers questions about the virus' infection and mortality rates, antibody tests, and how to safely reopen San Antonio in the wake of COVID-19.

Millions of Americans are out of work and struggling to make ends meet due to the ongoing public health crisis. In response, last week San Antonio City Council officially allocated $25 million to help pay the bills of those affected by COVID-19's economic fallout.


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