Camila Domonoske | Texas Public Radio

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Italy's highest court has ruled that the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles must hand over an ancient Greek statue that was first discovered by Italian fisherman.

The Getty Museum argues that since the statue is Greek, not Italian, it "is not and has never been part of Italy's cultural heritage." The museum says it believes the court order violates U.S. and international law, and that it plans to "continue to defend our legal right to the statue."

Les Moonves, the former head of CBS, actively obstructed an investigation into allegations that he sexually harassed and assaulted employees, according to a draft report obtained by The New York Times. As a result, Moonves may be barred from receiving the controversial $120 million severance package he had been promised under his contract.

As the remains of former President George H.W. Bush lie in state at the U.S. Capitol, LGBTQ activists and some journalists have been calling attention to his mixed legacy on the HIV/AIDS epidemic, which was raging during his administration.

Bush died at the age of 94, on the eve of World AIDS Day, Dec. 1.

A 69-year-old Dutchman who lost a court case on his request to reduce his official age by 20 years says he plans to appeal.

Emile Ratelband says he feels younger than his real age and, as NPR previously reported, he maintains his life, and performance on dating apps, would improve if his legal age were 49. He said he would be willing to delay receiving a pension.

A district court in the eastern Dutch city of Arnhem was not convinced.

Jean-Claude Arnault, a French-Swedish photographer and artistic impresario, has lost his appeal after he challenged his conviction for rape.

In fact, the appeals court found him guilty of a second rape, and extended his prison sentence.

Arnault, 72, is married to a member of the Swedish Academy, the group that chooses the Nobel Prize in Literature. Allegations that he assaulted multiple women have roiled the Academy and caused this year's Nobel Prize in Literature to be delayed indefinitely.

David Attenborough, the naturalist and broadcaster, sounded a dire warning in a speech Monday to the U.N. climate conference in Poland.

Sully, the service dog of former President George H.W. Bush, spent Sunday night lying before Bush's flag-draped casket in Houston.

Jim McGrath, spokesman for the Bush family, tweeted out a photo on Sunday night, captioning it "mission complete."

Jeb Bush retweeted the image, adding "Sully has the watch."

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

In Anchorage, Alaska, people took refuge under tables and fled outdoors on Friday morning, as a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck just north of the city.

Some roads, bridges and buildings have been damaged, and some businesses shuttered for the day. Schools were evacuated and parents told to pick up their children — a challenge, in some cases, given the traffic jams that quickly formed across the city.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in the Central Coastal region of California.

Lettuce from other parts of the U.S. and Mexico is safe to eat, the CDC says. However, if you're not sure where your romaine lettuce came from, err on the side of caution and throw it out, health experts say.

A total of 43 people in 12 states have been infected in this outbreak. No deaths have been reported.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

The situation at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry has been chaotic and confusing in recent days. And reactions from the American public suggest that photos and footage from the scene serve as a sort of Rorschach test.

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