Alexandra Hart | Texas Public Radio

Alexandra Hart

Intern for Texas Standard.

From Texas Standard.

Hackers are a threat to credit card information, election data, and now – according to a report from iDefense, an arm of consulting group Accenture – they’ve come for the energy sector.

From Texas Standard.

If you’ve ever been curious about the return on investment for a college degree – think employment rates, student debt burden, and the like – you’d be pretty much out of luck. Since 2008, there’s been a ban on a federal database that would track information linking student education data to national employment data.

From Texas Standard.

Legend has it that the Easter Bunny has its origins in Fredericksburg, which explains why the city is preparing for a major annual event this weekend: the Easter Fires of Fredericksburg Pageant.

From Texas Standard.

After more than half a century, the U.S. appears to have become a net exporter of liquefied natural gas. The last time we would have been able to say that was when Eisenhower was president. The development is a major shift from predictions just a decade ago, when the U.S. was expected to have to rely on liquefied natural gas imports from Russia, Northern Africa and the Middle East forever, it seemed. What’s changed? Here to put things into perspective is energy insider Matt Smith, director of commodity research at Clipper Data.

From Texas Standard.

As of now, about half a million people have registered to vote in July’s  presidential election in Mexican, and there are a few things you should probably know about the way our neighbor to the south conducts its elections.  For one, this year, Mexicans will elect the first cohort of politicians that will be eligible to be reelected.

From Texas Standard.

After Hurricane Harvey, many Texans realized just how wrong experts were about flood control measures in the state’s most populous city. But Houston isn’t the only Texas city at risk from bad or outdated flood plans.

An investigation by the Corpus Christi Caller Times found that the city’s flood maps are outdated – they’ve gone without revision for three decades. The maps were first drafted for a vastly different Corpus Christi.

From Texas Standard.

What’s the most popular cocktail in the U.S.? Here’s a hint: It’s one that holds a special place in the hearts of Tex-Mex fans – the humble margarita. But you better enjoy one while you can because we’re on the brink of a full-blown tequila crisis. Reuters reports that agave shortages have manufacturers of the spirit on edge, concerned about keeping up with demand as tequila’s popularity soars.

From Texas Standard:

2018 could shape up to be a big year in the fight over partisan and racial gerrymandering. Cases involving redistricting are on the docket in the Supreme Court as well as other federal courts. And if you've ever looked at a map of Texas congressional districts, you know these court decisions will have implications in the Lone Star State.

From Texas Standard.

One hundred years ago Sunday, a posse made up of Texas Rangers and the U.S. military raided the border village of Porvenir in the middle of the night. The lawmen took 15 boys and men of Mexican descent to a bluff and shot them. The Porvenir Massacre is a little-known dark stain on Texas’ history.

Historian Glenn Justice says the massacre happened during a chaotic time.

From Texas Standard.

Reports last year show that immigrant detention centers in Texas, including the Karnes City and Dilley centers, were operating below capacity. Illegal border crossing arrests are at a 46-year low. There is one immigration-related statistic, though, that increased over the past year. A report by the Houston Chronicle and the nonprofit investigative organization Injustice Watch found that 2017 was the deadliest year since 2009 in immigrant detention facilities nationwide. Twelve detainees died in custody last year – and some of those deaths were deemed preventable.

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