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Texas Delegates Show Support As Hillary Clinton Makes History

Some Texas women at the Democratic National Convention reacted with emotion last night as Hillary Clinton became the first woman in the country to lead a major political party’s ticket.
 

The Philadelphia arena was packed as Clinton made history as the first woman to accept the nomination to lead a major party’s presidential ticket. 

 

"And so my friends it is with humility, determination and boundless confidence in America's promise that I accept your nomination," Clinton says.

Texans watching from a standing room only section applauded and cheered, including state Senator Sylvia Garcia from Houston.

 

Garcia, who has been in public office for 30 years, says she understands the difficulty women candidates face.   Clinton’s nomination is exactly the struggle women seeking public office have faced.  Garcia says Clinton’s nomination follows years of struggle. 

"Many of us have been working many years to see more women elected to office and obviously this was the unreachable goal, the last glass ceiling," Garcia says.

 

Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez is the first woman to be elected sheriff in Dallas County.  Clinton’s nomination made her emotional.

 

"So on the nomination I not only teared up, I danced because it’s a good time for a woman to become president," Valdez says.

 

Jen Ramos came to the convention as a Sanders supporter from Austin. She says the convention and Clinton’s acceptance speech have inspired her to one day consider  public office.

"Although I know it takes time and experience but I'm only 24.  I'm 24 and I am a campaign manager which is exciting for me and I didn't think I would ever get to that point considering a year ago I was waiting tables full-time as a waitress," Ramos says.

It’s difficult for women in the political arena to gain respect and be taken seriously, Ramos says. She thinks having a female presidential nominee is a first step toward changing that.