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Ryan Poppe / TPR News

1.8 million Texans lack broadband Internet access, and most of them live in rural Texas. Studies from the U.S. chamber and others have shown the massive impact connecting Texas could have. This is part one of a multi-part series focusing on Connecting Rural Texas.

Unlike cities, rural areas rarely have public right of ways. So today a rural electric cooperative trying to provide broadband has to go back to each property owner where the co-op already owns poles strung with electrical cabling to ask if they can string broadband fiber-optic cable.

Photos courtesy of candidates

WEDNESDAY at noon on "The Source" - On June 8, District 4 voters will decide whether to elect Johnny Arredondo or Adriana Rocha Garcia to represent their interests on the San Antonio City Council.

The position was previously held by Rey Saldaña, who termed out after eight years of serving the residents of District 4, where income segregation and opportunity gaps are major concerns.

Heide Couch / 60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs

Starting this October, the Defense Health Agency will take control of all San Antonio-area military medical facilities, including Brooke Army Medical Center, from each of their respective commands.

Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/30iZUIg

Technology has transformed how we interact with the world, how we communicate with each other and how we consume information. Between smartphones, computers, tablets, TV sets and video games, screen time can easily dominate your waking hours. 

What does this increased digital consumption mean for the human brain? How can you find a screen-time limit that works for your life?

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

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