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Civil War
00000174-b11b-ddc3-a1fc-bfdbb1a20000The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865. The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation. Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War." E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.Airs: Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

This Week in the Civil War - #903

  On Tuesday, August 23, 1864 a politically beleaguered President Abraham Lincoln surprised his Cabinet members, asking each official to sign a memo which pledged cooperation with his successor, if he was defeated for re-election in November.  The memo noted “it will be my duty to so co-operate with the President elect, as to save the Union between the election and the inauguration; as he will have secured his election on such ground that he can not possibly save it afterwards.”  An increasingly pessimistic Lincoln clearly feared that a new President, most likely the Peace Democrat George McClellan, would not continue to pursue Union victory on the battlefield but elect for a negotiated end to the American Civil War. Clearly, Lincoln doubted his own re-election as president of the United States.