Border & Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Border & Immigration

Homeland Security agents created a fake university in Michigan to attract foreign nationals who wanted to use student status to extend U.S. visa privileges, according to a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday. The University of Farmington didn't have any professors or hold any classes — but that didn't matter to "students" who used the sham school to stay in the U.S. illegally, the government says.

Border Wall Negotiations Begin In Washington

Jan 31, 2019

Capitol Hill negotiators are hopeful of an agreement as they officially kick off talks Wednesday on a homeland security spending bill stalled over funding for President Donald Trump's proposed border wall.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Updated Jan. 25 at 9:05 a.m. ET

The Trump administration on Friday is implementing its plan requiring asylum-seekers, mainly from Central America, to remain in Mexico while their legal proceedings are conducted in the U.S. court system.

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

With negotiations over reopening the government at a standstill, President Trump offered to back temporary protections for some immigrants brought to the country illegally as children, many of whom are now adults, in exchange for funding for a wall on the Southern border.

In a White House speech on Saturday, Trump also offered to extend the Temporary Protected Status program that blocks deportation of certain immigrants fleeing civil unrest or natural disasters.


 

As the government shutdown approached its fifth week and Washington Democrats and President Donald Trump showed no signs of coming to an agreement on how to end the stalemate Tuesday, U.S. Border Patrol vehicles could be seen patrolling just north of the Rio Grande near El Paso’s Paso del Norte bridge.

For Tijuana, the Central American caravans that arrived there in November have become a humanitarian challenge. For the Trump administration, they are a national security threat, as well as a potent and convenient symbol of why the United States needs stronger border security.

"We don't know who else is in that group," says Rodney Scott, chief of the San Diego Border Patrol Sector. "The sheer numbers indicate there are nefarious people within the caravans."

Photography by Harrison Photographic

Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington D.C.-based think tank that supports liberal immigration policies, is also the author of “Vanishing Frontiers: The Forces Driving Mexico and the United States Together.”

In the book, Selee explains how the relationship between Mexico and the U.S. has evolved in the 25 years since the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

@SeleeAndrew https://twitter.com/seleeandrew/status/1000475095394070528

President Trump repeatedly referred to the North American Free Trade Agreement as “the worst trade deal ever made.” But how did the agreement serve border relations since its signing in 1993?

Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington D.C. think tank that supports liberal immigration policies, joins us to talk about his new book about the forces that have bound the U.S. and Mexico since NAFTA was enacted.


From Texas Standard:

Texas Standard has been inviting new members of the Texas delegation on Capitol Hill for on-air meet-and-greet sessions. Recent news has made these conversations especially timely: earlier this week we spoke about the shutdown and the situation at the border with a newly minted Democratic representative, Colin Allred. Now it's Lance Gooden's turn; he's the Republican freshman elected in November to take the place of Jeb Hensarling representing District 5, which covers parts of Dallas and East Texas.

Gooden says he supports President Donald Trump's idea to declare a national emergency in order to secure funding for the border wall. He says Trump would need to do that "especially if he wants to get what he wants because I don't think he's gonna get it in Congress."

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