Border & Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Border & Immigration

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Oscar Cantua was one of 5100 graduates at the University of Texas at San Antonio’s 2019 Spring Commencement. He received an undergraduate degree in physics. It stemmed from an early interest in black holes. But his path to graduation was a rocky one. Oscar, his mother and his older sister left Mexico when he was only five. 

Editor's note: This story contains descriptions and photos of human remains that some readers may find disturbing.

Border Patrol agents steer their all-terrain buggy through dense brush on the historic King Ranch. They're looking for a human skeleton.

They spotted bones earlier in the day when they were chasing a group of migrants through this pasture, and they marked the GPS coordinates. Now they're returning with a sheriff's deputy.

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A federal appeals court this week ruled that a Trump administration program that sends asylum-seekers back to Mexico may continue pending a final decision on a lawsuit that seeks to eliminate the program entirely.

The decision angered immigrant advocates, who say the policy, officially known as Migrant Protection Protocols, is having the opposite effect of what its name would suggest.

The number of migrants apprehended at the Southern border surpassed 100,000 for the second consecutive month, according to new figures released by the Trump administration.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection apprehended 109,144 migrants in April. That is more than 5,400 over the total in the month of March, and it is the highest monthly total since 2007.

Giant tent structures have been erected in Texas to serve as short-term detention facilities to process a huge influx of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The facilities are open Friday in El Paso, Texas, and in the state's Rio Grande Valley next to the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge.

SVREP

Lydia Camarillo, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, plays a key role in developing SVREP’s nonpartisan voter mobilization efforts.  

For people familiar with the lonesome highways of far West Texas and New Mexico, it's an unusual sight: The ubiquitous Border Patrol checkpoints are all closed. Last month, Homeland Security shifted the checkpoint agents to the border to help process the crush of migrant asylum-seekers.

Otero County, N.M., is so alarmed by the possibility of illegal narcotics flowing north unchecked that it has declared a local state of emergency.

From Texas Standard:

On Wednesday, The New York Times published an article with a dark, grainy photo of a man carrying a small child through a desolate cornfield. The man was a U.S. Border Patrol agent, and the child was a 3-year-old whom smugglers apparently had abandoned. The child’s name and a phone number were written on his shoes.

Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

President Donald Trump has long touted the need for a U.S. southern border wall. The years-long debate has drawn comments from both sides of the aisle, as well as from the communities who call the international border home. But there’s more to the vast and diverse region than meets the eye.

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