Border & Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Border & Immigration

A young girl at a migrant shelter in Nuevo Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

A group of women sit on a white wooden bench at Casa Del Migrante Amar in Nuevo Laredo, chatting and eating fruit on a blistering hot summer day.

More than 100 migrants are at the shelter. Some are from Central America and others come from across Latin America.

One of the women, Magda, fled Venezuela’s oppressive regime. On her way to Nuevo Laredo, she heard stories about the area being dangerous. The day after she arrived, she was robbed. 

Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Chicana writer Cherríe Moraga is the author of the literary memoir, “Native Country of the Heart.” It explores not just Moraga’s life, but that of her mother, Elvira.  Elvira was born in 1914. Her father hired 11-year-old Elvira and her siblings as cotton pickers in California. As a young teen, she worked at a Tijuana casino that was frequented by Hollywood stars and mob bosses.

Customs and Border Protection officials are denying that a Border Patrol agent asked a 3-year-old girl to choose which of her parents would be sent back to Mexico.

Verónica G. Cárdenas

The U.S.-Mexico border recently dominated news headlines, from reports on overcrowded detention facilities to the “Stay in Mexico” policy. Two journalists say the region is more complex and culturally rich than what is portrayed in mainstream media

Then, young people living in San Antonio public housing get an education in art and culture in a printmaking summer workforce session.

"I'm here today because I want to put an end to this," Yazmin Juárez told members of Congress tearfully on Wednesday.

Lawmakers listened as Juárez testified about the preventable death of her daughter in 2018, weeks after they were released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody.

For the first time this year, the number of migrants taken into custody by immigration authorities after crossing the Southwest border dropped in June.

The Department of Homeland Security announced on Tuesday that about 104,000 migrants were taken into custody after crossing the Southwest border — a 28% drop from May.

Migrant flows typically slow down in the hotter summer months, and federal officials credited Mexico with doing more to secure its borders and stop migrants from crossing into the U.S.

Mallory Falk

Artists from around the country gathered in El Paso Friday night for what they called an “artistic uprising” at the U.S.-Mexico border. With an international bridge as their backdrop, they sang, played music, and recited poetry expressing love for migrants and denouncing family separation and child detention.

Courtesy of Dept. of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Thousands of asylum seekers arrive at the United States southern border, and an administration deems them as a threat to the country. This is not a depiction of our nation’s current immigration climate, but one from nearly four decades ago.

One Catholic priest defied the Reagan administration and the power of the Catholic Church to step up and support Central American refugees.

Office of Inspector General

Federal government inspectors released a report pointing to dangerous overcrowding at Border Patrol facilities in the Rio Grande Valley, a region where a majority of the migrant crossings are taking place.

The Trump administration is seeking to fine some immigrants, who are in the United States illegally, hundreds of thousands of dollars for failing to take steps to leave after being ordered to do so, according to government documents obtained by NPR.

The Department of Homeland Security sent out a batch of notices across the country to targeted individuals ordering them to pay fines of up to nearly $500,000 for "failing to depart the U.S. as previously agreed," among other factors.

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