Arts & Culture | Texas Public Radio

Arts & Culture

Arts and culture news, criticism, and programming from TPR/NPR.

From Texas Standard:

Charley Crockett is no cookie-cutter cowboy. He grew up in the Rio Grande Valley as the son of a single mother, and he lived on the streets as a wandering musician, drifting from the Valley to New Orleans and New York before winding his way back to Texas.  

But no matter where he is, he has an unmistakable sound and style that is garnering sensational reviews from Rolling Stone and Billboard magazines, where his latest collection of songs landed in the top 10 on the blues album chart.

But calling his music “blues” can be misleading because it seems to weave some thread that ties together the Big Apple, the Big Easy and that big valley in South Texas that he once called home.

In the opening scene of Pavarotti, the new documentary by director Ron Howard, the popular tenor travels deep into the Amazon jungle in search of an old opera house where the great Enrico Caruso may have once sung.

The building is shuttered, but because he's Luciano Pavarotti the door is unlocked for him to belt out a few honeyed notes from the stage. His fabulous voice soars into the vast emptiness of the auditorium.

Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

When the Museum Reach stretch of the San Antonio River was revitalized and opened to the public in May 2009, it turned the littered, scrub-choked waterway into a one-of-a-kind linear park. A decade later, one of the Reach's most interesting aspects still has a hidden mystery.


Lydia Mendoza image: Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images. Historical marker credited to Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio.

Lydia Mendoza, known as “La Alondra de la Fronteras (The Lark of the Border),” would have turned 103 on May 31. She was honored the day after her birthday with a historical marker at her gravesite at San Fernando Catholic Cemetery No. 2 in San Antonio.


Roky Erickson was rock music's ambassador to inner space.

Roky Erickson, the psychedelic lodestar who helmed The 13th Floor Elevators and wrote one of garage rock's original anthems, "You're Gonna Miss Me," died on Friday at the age of 71.

His death was announced by his brother, Mikel Erickson, on Facebook. No cause of death was provided.

courtesy the Doseum

From fun for the kids to a very grave celebration to an adult night out with Brazilian guitar, we’ve got your weekend lowdown.  


Legend has it that when Jacopo Tintoretto was 12 years old, he was so good at drawing that he rattled Titian — the master artist of Venice, 30 years his senior. Young Tintoretto was an apprentice in Titian's workshop and — as the story goes — the old master gone away for several days, and when he came back he found some of Tintoretto's drawings.

Tom Summer

From a new Art exhibit, to music in a really unusual place, to music in a delightfully usual place — the weekend holds the promise of lots of fun.  


Nathan Cone / TPR

When guitarist Kevin Eubanks sat in for two nights at Jazz, TX last month, there was so much great music that we just had to create a second show for broadcast!

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