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Panel Questions

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR News quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Peter Grosz, Paula Poundstone and Cristela Alonzo. And here again is your guest host, who Peter Sagal might want to note brought cookies for everyone...

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: ...It's Faith Salie.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT)

FAITH SALIE, HOST:

Mmm hmm - nut free. Thank you, Bill. Enjoy, y'all. In just a minute, Bill gets some rhymedial (ph) education in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. But right now, panel, time for you to answer some more questions about the week's news. Peter...

PETER GROSZ: Yes?

SALIE: ...The new "Fast And Furious" movie "Fast 9," or "F9," is a huge hit. It broke the post-pandemic box office record. And The New York Times film critic really only had one complaint. What was it?

GROSZ: That he was made to watch it.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Oh, no, my friend.

GROSZ: It was only one complaint. And it was, I didn't want to see it.

SALIE: I'll give you a hint. You want a hint?

GROSZ: Yeah, give me a hint.

SALIE: Helen Mirren and Vin Diesel sitting in a tree...

GROSZ: His complaint was that they're dating in it or he wanted to see them go out.

SALIE: Yes, Peter.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: You're right. He wanted Helen Mirren and Vin Diesel to kiss. Dame Helen Mirren...

GROSZ: Oh, my god.

SALIE: ...And Dame Vin Diesel both star in the new movie...

CRISTELA ALONZO: (Laughter).

SALIE: ...Prompting New York Times...

GROSZ: Sir Dame Vin Diesel - excuse me.

SALIE: ...Prompting New York Times film critic Kyle Buchanan to demand, quote, "they must kiss."

GROSZ: (Laughter).

SALIE: He even asked Mirren about it. Her response was, quote, "yes." Have y'all seen this - any of these movies in this franchise?

ALONZO: I was a big fan of the first, like, two, three ones. And then I don't understand why we saw - like, how can we keep driving?

GROSZ: Are they lost? Is that why they keep driving?

ALONZO: No, they're running errands. Like, I think that's what "F9" is about.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: It's cooler, yeah.

ALONZO: I think they're just running errands...

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

ALONZO: ...Right now. It's like, oh...

GROSZ: In one of them, they're just going to be, like, Uber drivers or something.

ALONZO: Yes.

POUNDSTONE: You know what I especially don't like about the "Fast And Furious" movies, is that they don't use their blinkers.

ALONZO: (Laughter).

GROSZ: That makes you furious.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah, it does. I often drive with my blinker on for quite a while. And then when I realize it's on, I sort of overreact, and I push the stick up too far, and then it makes the other blinker go on.

ALONZO: (Laughter).

POUNDSTONE: And then I put it back on the other side. And so basically, it's like, left blinker, right blinker, left blinker, right blinker. And that is a signal. What it says is, don't drive near me.

ALONZO: (Laughter).

SALIE: Paula, a new study in the Journal of Career Assessment looked at kids' dream jobs and concluded that we should be telling our kids not to do what?

POUNDSTONE: Give me a hint.

SALIE: Maybe, you know, live practically. They should not...

POUNDSTONE: Oh, that they're not going to be rich. They're not going to be singers and...

SALIE: Right.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

SALIE: Not follow their dreams.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT)

SALIE: According to a new study, most kids aspire to jobs that are incredibly difficult to obtain. So parents should be teaching their children to consider multiple options to, quote, "shoot for the moon, but have a backup plan so they can land in the stars."

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

SALIE: But not by being an astronaut because almost no one becomes an astronaut.

POUNDSTONE: Right.

SALIE: All the responsibility to lower expectations shouldn't just be carried by parents, right? We need a Disney song that's like, (singing) I want to work in retail much longer than expected.

ALONZO: (Singing) Late-night shift at Denny's, a late-night shift at Denny's, which I worked.

GROSZ: Yeah, but in the song, they're like on stage singing. And in their head, they're like (singing) I want to work at Denny's.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: I don't know about you, Peter. I know you have a kid. Every night, I read to my kids that great book "Oh, The Uber She'll Drive."

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: And "Alexander And The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Every Day."

ALONZO: "Green Eggs And Ham: Why Do We Eat Them Anyway?" (laughter).

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WORKING FOR MY BABY")

LINCOLN GROUNDS AND PAT REYFORD: (Singing) Got to start dreaming (ph) - that missus, too. Wipe the windows in the bathroom and the downstairs, too. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.