San Antonio's Tricentennial | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's Tricentennial

San Antonio's roots go back into the late 1600s, but it was made official in May 1718 when Fray Antonio de San Buenaventura y Olivares and Martín de Alarcón, Governor of Coahuila y Tejas established Mission San Antonio de Valero and Presidio San Antonio de Béxar.

Courtesy Trinity University Press

There are countless stories to tell of the people who lived in, worked in and shaped the community throughout the 300 years since San Antonio's establishment. 


David Amram

When HemisFair '68 opened its gates on April 6, 1968, scores of dignitaries, world leaders, and A-list entertainers passed through San Antonio over the next six months. Not all were invited as performers. Percussionist George Coleman came, not as a participant in the fair, but as a street performer, a busker.

George Fuermann | http://bit.ly/2jLdQ9X / Wikimedia Commons

From the Aguayo Expedition reaching San Antonio to the "Great Tamale Incident," to a pair of deadly tragedies at Fiesta, San Antonio’s history is as varied and colorful as the people who inhabit the Alamo City.

This is Texas Public Radio’s San Antonio Tricentennial Minute, a look back at 300 years of Alamo City culture, one day at a time, written and produced by David Martin Davies and narrated by contributor Yvette Benavides.

TPR's San Antonio Tricentennial Minute is made possible by:

C.H. Guenther and Son, Inc. & The History Master of Arts Program at UTSA

GoodReads

Although writer Carol Hoff was born in Tucson in 1900 and spent her first eight years outside of Texas, she was a true Texan. Her great-grandparents came to Texas as pioneers in 1834, settling in what eventually was the town of Yorktown, the important mid-point along the immigration and trade route from the ill-fated port of Indianola to San Antonio.


Public Domain | http://bit.ly/2GNjyBO / WikiCommons

From the invasion of the Alamo City to the maiden voyage of the San Antonio-Boerne passenger train to  integration of the city's lunch counters to the “Dirty Thirties,” San Antonio’s history is as varied and colorful as the people who inhabit it.

This is Texas Public Radio’s San Antonio Tricentennial Minute, a look back at 300 years of Alamo City culture, one day at a time, written and produced by David Martin Davies and narrated by contributor Yvette Benavides.

March Tricentennial Minute is made possible by The Witte Museum

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