San Antonio's Tricentennial | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's Tricentennial

San Antonio's roots go back into the late 1600s, but it was made official in May 1718 when Fray Antonio de San Buenaventura y Olivares and Martín de Alarcón, Governor of Coahuila y Tejas established Mission San Antonio de Valero and Presidio San Antonio de Béxar.

Ansen Seale

Near railroad tracks, in the shadow of the Interstate 37 interchange, and about a football field away from the Alamodome, sits a house dating back to 1883 — a mauve- and cream-colored Roatzsch-Griesenbeck-Arciniega house, the only old structure within hundreds of yards.


"Vintage HemisFair '68 Postcard": The Texas World's Fair was held in San Antonio. The Tower Of The Americas was buit for HemisFair '68
Joe Haupt / Flickr Creative Commons | http://bit.ly/2OB3RVA

From the hidden treasure of Pancho Villa to Johnny Cash's wedding at St. Anne’s Catholic Church to the construction of the Tower of the Americas, San Antonio’s history is as varied and colorful as the people who inhabit the Alamo City.

This is Texas Public Radio’s San Antonio Tricentennial Minute, a look back at 300 years of Alamo City culture, one day at a time, written and produced by David Martin Davies and narrated by contributor Yvette Benavides.

Three hundred years ago, San Antonio was a military outpost called the New World — a place that was far away, unexplored and uncertain. Char Miller, a W. M Keck professor of environmental analysis at Pomona College in Claremont California and author of "San Antonio A Tricentennial History," joins us to discuss the Alamo City's past on this "Texas Matters."


Lee Dunkelberg / Texas Public Radio

From the announcement of HemisFair to San Antonio's short reign at Texas' most populous city to the last chili queens to the return of Juan Seguin, the Alamo City’s history is as varied and colorful as the people who inhabit it.

This is Texas Public Radio’s San Antonio Tricentennial Minute, a look back at 300 years of Alamo City culture, one day at a time, written and produced by David Martin Davies and narrated by contributor Yvette Benavides.

Pedro Szekely / Flickr Creative Commons | http://bit.ly/2LuqvNN

From the reimagination of the River Walk, to one record store owner's fight to protect the right to sell the classic rap album "As Nasty As They Want To Be," to the Spurs winning their first title, San Antonio’s history is as varied and colorful as the people who inhabit the Alamo City.

This is Texas Public Radio’s San Antonio Tricentennial Minute, a look back at 300 years of Alamo City culture, one day at a time, written and produced by David Martin Davies and narrated by contributor Yvette Benavides.

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