medical marijuana

The Cannabis Training University / CC

Ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, Texans will be seeing — and hearing — a lot of  campaign ads. But, on top of the typical election year barrage of political commercials, some rural Texans will also be seeing a very different kind of ad.

 

 

A painkiller prescription could become a ticket for medical marijuana in Illinois. Lawmakers there passed a bill making anyone with a prescription for opioids eligible for its medical cannabis program.

With this move, Illinois joins a growing number of states turning to legal cannabis in the fight against painkiller addiction.

"As we see the horrible damage inflicted by opioid use and misuse, it seems like a very low-cost and low-risk alternative," says state Sen. Don Harmon, a Democrat from Oak Park, Ill., and sponsor of the Senate version of the bill.

Think Science: Medical Marijuana

May 18, 2018

As the opioid crisis worsens, more Americans are looking toward alternative sources of pain relief, one of which is marijuana. Cannabis has been reported to alleviate pain and anxiety, and may benefit glaucoma and epilepsy patients.

At this Think Science event, TPR reporter Ryan Poppe moderates a discussion on medical marijuana, with special emphasis on CBD oil and other non-psychoactive properties of cannabis that may benefit patients. 

Guests:

Ryan Poppe

UPDATED 6:02 p.m.

There are plenty of products sold in Texas with cannabidiol — or CBD — listed as their main ingredient. CBD is seemingly everywhere these days, from the local pharmacy to coffee houses. But Texas health officials plan to ban these products if they are not sold by one of three dispensaries set up by the state.


By the time Ann Marie Owen, 61, turned to marijuana to treat her pain, she was struggling to walk and talk. She was also hallucinating.

For four years, her doctor prescribed a wide range of opioids for transverse myelitis, a debilitating disease that caused pain, muscle weakness and paralysis.

The drugs not only failed to ease her symptoms, they hooked her.

When her home state of New York legalized marijuana for the treatment of select medical ailments, Owens decided it was time to swap pills for pot. But her doctors refused to help.

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